The French Revolution

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Bobbie Gasparri10/6/09
Global 10, Period 2French Revolution
Inspired by the achievement of the American Revolution, the people of France decided to protest against the unjust monarchy and have a revolution of their own. France needed a change in leadership, and a shift in power in order for this revolution to be a success .Unfortunately, for the people to get what they needed from the government, they took drastic and disturbing measures to make their voices heard. Through this France not only left an impact on themselves, but influenced other nations in need of change in their governments.

Prior to the revolution, France was going into turmoil due to King Louis XVI and Queen Marie Antoinette's spending habits. King Louis XVI believed in divine right, which meant that he thought he was entitled to any and everything he pleased without the input of anyone else. Also, due to his strict censorship of speech, press, and other outrageous laws he put into action caused a riot within the people. (Doc.1) Another huge problem within, were the taxes. Due to the economy failing, Louis XVI decided to raise taxes in order to bring more money into France. In French society, there were three estates established by the government; the Clergy, the Nobility, and the Commoners. Both the Clergy and the Nobility owned a majority of the land, and were exempt from taxes. The Commoners on the other hand, weren't so fortunate. They paid full taxes, owned a small portion of land, and made up almost all of France's population (Doc. 2). The Commoners very low salary also went towards the Clergy, and the Nobility which damaged their lifestyles greatly. This was a major reason why the people of France revolted and started a revolution. They realized that paying full taxes, having the least amount of rights, and owning the least amount of land due to their King and Queens inadequacy to control a country was immoral.

In the commencement of the French...
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