The Five Levels of Organization in the Human Body

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The Five Levels of Organization in the Human Body
An organism is a living thing that can produce all basic life processes. In the human body there are five levels of organization in which each one will perform a specific operation. In order to understand how these processes work, observation of the structural organization of each level is necessary. Each level is organized from the smallest form to the largest. For instance, the chemical level is the smallest there for it is the first level followed by the cellular, tissue, organ, and system level.

The chemical level is all about examining atoms and how they are joined to form molecules such as water, sugar, and protein. These molecules then combine and form macromolecules which make up the organelles. The organelles are tiny structures that determine the cell function of the organism. In the cellular level there are individual organelles defined by a specific purpose. The nucleus, for example, is an organelle that helps with the reproduction of cells.

The following level of organization is the tissue function. During this process there are similar types of cells that are joined forming tissue such as epithelial tissue, which covers the body surfaces and organs. The joining of these tissues then develops organs. In the organ level there are structures that are made up of two or more different types of tissues. The collection of these organs forms to perform a specific function. Thus, formation of the system level of organization is concluded. One system called the gastrointestinal system assists in the waste of the body as well as others who all serve a specific function. This level is the largest of all where everything from atoms to organs work together to form systems that enable basic life processes and functions.
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