The First Seven Years

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Growing and learning is a part of life that no one is exempt from. This fact influences

everyone, whether it be a young child learning to share or an old man learning to let go.

Feld, in The First Seven Years, finds that he has to let go of several of his own issues to

allow his daughter to undergo her own growth and learning.

Feld is the typical father, he wants only the best for his daughter. Feld wants the

best education, the best man, the perfect life. He believes that ,as a farther, he can make

her life perfect simply by telling her the necessities of life. However, after several

incidences Feld understands that he must learn to let go. He discovers that he must let go

of sending her to college, "He had begged her to go.." he had to let go of the fact that

Miriam would not marry the perfect man. "Let her marry an educated man and live a

better life." In the end Feld learned that he could not alter his daughters future in anyway.

The only thing he could do is to keep his silence. "Then he realized that what he had

called ugly was not Sobel, but Miriam's life if she married him." When Feld explains to the

readers that Miriam is always reminded him that she wants freedom, he is revealing to the

reader that he is growing and beginning to understand that he has to let go so, Miriam is

free to live her life, and make her own mistakes.

Although, being able to let go is a small part of the growth that can proceed. Feld

also comes to an understanding, he comes to peace with what he has no control over.

"...all his dreams for her- why he had slaved and destroyed his heart with anxiety and

labor- all these dreams of a better life were dead." Everyone has their own way of dealing

with the "undesirable" moments of life, and Feld, in the end, was at peace with the idea

that someday his daughter would marry a refuge shoemaker. "He felt for his daughter a

strange gripping sorrow, as if she were...
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