The first cause of the animal extinction

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The first cause of the animal extinction is unregulated illegal hunting animals. Hunting rare animals is a human cause of extinction that may represent a major, or dominant factor in the decline of certain species, particularly those that are endemic to a small geographic area, or have a small or slow-regenerating population overall. Unfortunately, across the world various socio-economic factors drive hunting of endangered animal species, and where this occurs at unregulated, unsustainable levels, vulnerable species may be pushed towards extinction. Although regulations and legislation may exist at a national or international level, often sufficient infrastructure, awareness or resources are in place for any effective impact. Killing of endangered animals is due to ignorance or misconceived stereotypes, as is often the case of bats, snakes and arachnids that are commonly, but incorrectly perceived to be aggressive or necessarily dangerous. Besides, pollution also leads to the animal extinction today. Pollution can occur by natural or human activities in many forms. Natural pollution events may result from cataclysmic geographic processes like volcanic eruption, floods and earthquakes, or from overpopulation of ecosystems by specific species or other processes. Natural pollution events commonly cause local extinction events but rarely are sufficiently wide scale to cause complete extinction of significant numbers of animal taxa. Human pollution can take many forms, but usually arises when toxic substances are dumped, either advertently or inadvertently, into biologically diverse areas in earth. Anthropogenic pollution may have knock-on consequences, for example, eutrophication. Large scale anthropogenic pollution events like oil spills may have the scope to cause the complete extinction of animal taxa, particularly those that are
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