The Fallacy of Relevance

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Diosah Joan C. Tolosa
1st year
BSBA-MGT
January 16, 2013
The Fallacies of Relevance

1. Argumentum ad Hominem ( Argument the Man )
The English translation for the Latin phrase, “ Argumentum ad Homimem. ” is an “ Argument against the Man or Woman,” or more accurately, “ Argument against the Person. ” Person A claims that he owns an 3 Gaisano Malls in Mindanao. (First Person ) But knowing that Person A is uneducated and have mental problems and have no documents to prove. So therefore, he didn’t own an 3 Gaisano Malls in Mindanao.

The Three Forms of Ad Hominem

2.1 ABUSIVE AD HOMINEM

The fallacy of abusive ad hominem is committed when the “second person” refutes the claim of the “first person” by verbally abusing his or her character.

My group mates suggests that lowering the fines in this coming CBAA Days will be a good idea – this is coming from a woman who eats a ice cream Big Ben’s each night!

2.2 CIRCUMSTANTIAL AD HOMINEM

The fallacy of circumstantial ad hominem is committed when the “second person” discusses the circumstances directly affecting the “first person” (i.e religion, profession, ethnic background, gender, age, political affiliation, etc.) instead of the argument itself.

We should disagree about the same sex marriage because after all it’s not good to see and it is not the right thing to do.

2.3 TU QUOQUE

“Tu Quoque” is the Latin of “you, too.” The fallacy of ad hominem tu quoque is committed when the “second person” attempts to shit the burden of guilt back to the “first person” in the order to appear himself as a hypocrite in the sense that there is inconsistency between “what he claims” and “what does”; “what he preaches” and “what he practices.”

The Americans keeps on working everyday, therefore we can keep on working everyday too.

Poisoning the Well

abusing someone for sheer pleasure does not qualify as an example of an ad hominem fallacy.

Aljane: Boss,you heard my side of the story why I think Nida should be fired and not me. Now I am sure that Nida will come to you and with so many excuses and lies that she has created.

Snob Appeal
The fallacy of attempting to prove a conclusion by appealing to what an elite or a select few (but not necessarily an authority) in a society thinks or believes.

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Mob Appeal

Elect me for President, and our country will get back to its clean and green sorroundings. 2. Argumentum ad Populum (Argument to the People)

Another fallacy that bears the Latin term is “Argumentum ad Populum,” which means “Argument to the People.” Its others notions include “Appeal to the People,” “Appeal to the Masses,” “Appeal to the Popularity,” “Appeal to the Majority,” or “Appeal to the Gallery.”

Rape and harassing must be stop. It is violence against the women.

3. Argumentum ad Vercundiam (Argument to Authority)

“Vercundiam” can be literally translated as “feeling of shame,” hence, it is appropriately known as “Appeal to Modesty.” Some writers give it another name: “Appeal to Inappropriate, Unqualified Authority,” or “Misuse of Authority.”

The answer of an Math major student in SMC is wrong according to their Math Instructor.

4. Argumentum ad Misericordiam (Argument to Pity)

The words pity, mercy, or misery are the English equivalents of the Latin term “Misericordis,” thus, this fallacy is commonly known as “Appeal to Pity, Mercy, or Mercy.”

A young woman who is applying a job. Her reason for applying is to earn for her family and to send her brother and sisters to school but she has no experience yet and she...
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