The Fall of the House of Usher

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The Fall of the House of Usher
Davidson and Lovecraft’s views about “The Fall of the House of Usher” both seem to be good analysis. Davidson’s view of how the family suffers from a “mental disorder”, and “Insanity,” and Lovecraft’s view of how “the brother, his twin sister, and the house all share a single soul.” Davidsons view seems to be the most logical to me in how one family can all suffer from mental disorders. In “The Fall of the House of Usher” Roderick Usher seems to be mentally ill throughout the story. When the narrator first arrived at the house and sat down with usher he “gazed upon him with a feeling of half pity, and half awe,” as if to show he was not looking well. He also acts strange as if something wrong was going on. At one point, Usher cry’s out, “I shall perish,” “I must perish in this deplorable folly,” like he is going to do something wrong. During the narrators stay at the house, Roderick Usher talks to the narrator about his sister one night. “While he spoke, the lady Madeline passed through a remote portion of the apartment, and, without having noticed my presence, disappeared.” The narrator says, “I learned that the glimpse I had obtained of her person would thus probably be the last I should obtain – that the lady, at least while living, would be seen by me no more.” It seems as though she is being hidden from the narrator throughout the story. Then “One evening, having been informed abruptly, that Lady Madeline was no more.” I believe that the family was a little insane, not only from long family illness, but also because of the house. Davidson’s analysis to me seemed to be more along the lines of the story than Lovecraft’s. The story does not mention a single soul like Lovecraft’s analysis.
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