The Exposure of Violence in Child Eye

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The Exposure of Violence in Child Eye
Aranka Simon
February 5, 2012
TSOCF 390: Introduction to Research

Table of contexts:

Introduction……………………………………………………………… pg. 3 Studies……………………………………………………………………..pg. 5 Protective Factors…………………………………………………………pg. 11 Conclusion………………………………………………………………...pg. 12 Citation…………………………………………………………………….pg. 14

Introduction:
Children from large states to small cities are exposed to violence in their homes at least one in their life. Other areas like communities, school and friends’ houses can expose children to violence, whether they are the victims of the violence or just a witness to the crime. Children that do wittiness a violence crime or that were involved can affect this child for the rest of their life. There is not enough research in our society as a whole has concentrated on the cause and affect this negative type of action this has in their life. The type of effects this can have on a child would be physical, mental and or emotional; these issues can affect a child life until adulthood and even longer. There is never a set limit on negative actions towards other can affect anyone. Most children that only witness violence in home or natural society settings are most likely to reenact this type of scene on other victims, or they could become victims themselves in the future when they would be involved in a relationship. In the meantime, the children that do witness negative violence between the parents, the children would be labeled as “silent victims”. Research suggests that between 3.3 million and 10 million children in the United States are exposed to domestic violence each year, and more than a decade of empirical studies indicates that this exposure can have significant negative effects on children's behavioral, emotional, social, and cognitive development (Behman , 1999, p.4).Most children do witness fighting… in other words negative interactions between other older kids could be at lunch, before or after school. This can have an affect or have the child soak in this type of action towards other victims at their school or other public settings. These children that do interact in violence at school typically learn from their homes of their parents, which this teaches the child it is ok to hit someone when another person upsets you. It is very unfortunate kid learn violence primarily from their homes. In the article “The mental health of children who witness domestic violence” it states: one of twenty five, in every class is exposed to witnessing domestic violence in their homes” (Meltzer, Doos, Vostains, Ford, & Goodman, 2009, p. 500). This means a child that has been exposed to this type of violence and knows their actions can hurt others, but in their mind it still is ok to hurt another victim if they (the child) were to get upset… This can label the child with a mental illness and receive negative messages from their parents. Parents are not the only ones that can send out a negative message to other children, but the community as well. Domestic violence is probably the worst kind of violence a child could be affect by. This can be very troubling, knowing the child is in arms reach of the parents during the abuse and the type of violence the parents are performing throws away all the protection and love the child needs. No child would be willing to run in their father’s arms for protection and love; if the child repeatedly has seen violence from this role model. In the article “Issues and Controversies in Documenting the Prevalence of Children’s exposure to Domestic Violence” has listed many different ways of a child being exposed to violence in one way or another in the form of their parents; observing violence, hearing parents fighting and knowing the consequences the mother receives from the father if she talks back, observing bruises on the parents (whomever the victim is), and becoming aware of the violence in the home (Bermann &Edleson, 2001, p19)....
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