The Enduring Skills of a Change Leader

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Contents
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS1
1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY3
2. CLASSIC SKILLS FOR LEADERS5
3. STICKY MOMENTS IN THE MIDDLE OF CHANGE—AND HOW TO GET UNSTUCK8 4. LITERATURE REVIEW10
5. ISSUES IN CONTEXT OF NEPALESE ORGANIZATIONS12
6. HOW TO IMPLEMENT CHANGE IN NEPALESE ORGANIZATION13
7. CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION14
8. BIBLIOGRAPHY15

1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
This Term Paper presents leading practices on enduring skills of a change leader in change management. It is intended for managers, leaders, executive officers and top level persons. The objective of enduring skills of change leaders is to minimize service downtime by ensuring that requests for changes are recorded and then evaluated, authorized, prioritized, planned, tested, implemented, documented and reviewed in a controlled and consistent manner. The bold stroke produces change, but so does "the inevitability of gradualness." The latter approach builds organizations that endure.

"There's nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in introducing a new order of things."

1.1INTRODUCTION
Hundreds of books and millions of dollars in consulting fees have been devoted to leadership and organizational change. No issue of the past 15 years has concerned more managers or a wider spectrum of organizations. Yet, for all the attention the subject merits, we see every day that certain kinds of change are simple. If you’re a senior executive, you can order budget reductions, buy or sell a division, form a strategic alliance or arrange a merger. Such bold strokes do produce fast change, but they do not necessarily build the long-term capabilities of the organization. Indeed, these leadership actions often are defensive, the result of a flawed strategy or a failure to adapt to changing market conditions. They sometimes mask the need for a deeper change in strategy structure or operations, and they contribute to the anxiety that accompanies sudden change. Years of study and experience show that the things that sustain change are not bold strokes but long marches- -the independent, discretionary and ongoing efforts of people throughout the organization. Real change requires people to adjust their behavior, and that behavior is often beyond the control of top management. Yes, as a senior executive, you can allocate resources for new product development or reorganize a unit: but you cannot order people to use their imaginations or work collaboratively. That’s why, in difficult situations, leaders who have neglected the long march often fall back on the bold stroke. It feels good (at least to the boss) to shake things up, but It exacts a toll on the organization.

1.2 FORCES OF CHANGE

Organizational change has become a way of life as a result of three forces: globalization, information technology and industry consolidation. In today’s world, all organizations, from the Fortune 500 to the local nonprofit agency, need greater reach. They need to be in more places, to be more aware of regional and cultural differences, and to integrate into coherent strategies the work occurring in different markets and communities. The first two forces for change—globalization and technology—will inevitably grow. But it’s not enough for organizations to simply go international or ‘get networked.” In a global, high-tech world, organizations need to be more fluid, inclusive and responsive. They need to manage complex information flows, grasp new ideas quickly, and spread those ideas throughout the enterprise. What counts is not whether everybody uses e-mail but whether people quickly absorb the impact of information and respond to opportunity. Industry consolidation, the business story of 1998-99, has a less certain future. But even if that trend abates, the impact of mergers, acquisitions and strategic alliances will be felt for years. Mergers and acquisitions bring both dangers and benefits to...
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