The Effects of Study Habits Used in Academic Performance

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Impact of parent involvement on student achievement
by
Susan Campbell and Sharon Glasgow
Seminar in Applied Theory and Research I

702.22

Brooklyn College

Professor Sharon O’Connor-Petruso

Department of Childhood Education

2009-2010

[pic]

brooklyn college
Abstract
impact of parent involvement on student achievement

BY: SUSAN CAMPBELL AND SHARON GLASGOW
Chairperson of the Supervisory Committee:

Table of Contents

Abstract

Introduction1
Statement of the Problem2
Review of Related Literature3
Statement of the Hypotheses8

Method9
Participants
Instruments
Experimental Design
Procedure

Results

Discussion

Implications

References17
Appendices19
Parent Release Form (A)
Parent Questionnaire (B)
Student Questionnaire (C)

Introduction

impact of parent involvement on student achievement

Parent involvement is absolutely essential to student achievement in school and in life. The overwhelming studies and research indicate that there are positive academic outcomes stemming from parental involvement with benefits beginning in early childhood throughout adolescence and beyond (Henderson & Mapp, 2002; Patrikakou, Weisberg, Redding, & Walberg, 2005).

The impact that parents can have on their child’s learning and achievement transcends income levels and social status. According to a study done by Anne T. Henderson and Nancy Berla, “In fact, the most accurate predictor of a student’s achievement in school is not income or social status, but the extent to which that student’s family is able to: 1. Create a home environment that encourages learning; 2. Express high (but not unrealistic) expectations for their children’s achievement and future careers; 3. Become involved in their children’s education at school and in the community.” If two of these three criteria are accomplished, children of low income families will achieve at or above the levels expected of middle class children.

A child’s learning is enhanced when schools encourage parents to stimulate their children’s intellectual development. Numerous studies have shown that the home environment has a powerful effect on what children and youth learn, not only in school but outside of school as well. This environment is considerably more powerful than the parents’ income and education in influencing what children learn in the first six years of life and during the twelve years of primary and secondary education. One major reason that parental influence is so strong, is because the children spend more than ninety percent of their time from infancy throughout their childhood outside school under the influence of their parents. Therefore, ultimately the parents are their first and most important teacher. (Weinstein & Walberg, 1983, Peng & Wright, 1994, Walberg & Paik, 1997)

When children achieve, everyone benefit. As children excel, the school is recognized, the teachers are recognized and the parents and other family members of those children are encouraged to extend their knowledge by going back to school.

Statement of the Problem

Parents are their children’s first and most important teachers. If children are to be successful in school, parents must participate actively in their children’s academic lives. A Lack of parental involvement impacts negatively on children’s academic performance. Therefore, by increasing parental involvement their child’s academic life, we will attempt to prove that their child’s grades and overall academic achievement will be improved.

Review of Literature

Parent involvement is a valuable component of any student’s education. It is a well-established fact that parental involvement is linked to children’s success at school. When parents are involved in their children’s education at home, they do better in school. (Henderson and Berla, 1994). The...
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