The Effects of Population

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The Effects of Population Density and Noise Paper
Terry L. Young
June 6, 2011
Steve Northam

The Effects of Population Density and Noise Paper
Many people are leaving the rural areas of the world to live in urban areas; they are finding it easier to live closer to work, school, and shopping areas. Although they may not spend as much for gas to run the vehicles, there are subjects such as territory, personal space and privacy that remain overlooked and should be considered before making the move. In this paper one will be able to understand the concepts of territoriality, privacy, and personal space, and also understand why these concepts have become increasingly important as populations become denser. This paper will clarify the effects that nature has on individuals who live in heavily populated areas and examine two strategies that can be used to reduce noise levels, not only in their homes but also in the workplace as well.

In an article written by W. H. Burt, Territoriality and Home Range Concepts as Applied to Mammals, published in the Journal of Mammals in 1943, Burt stated that “territoriality is the behavioristic trait manifested by a display of property ownership, that man considers to be his inherit right to own either as an individual or as a member of society, or both and that man is ready to protect this property at any cost” (p. 346).. This is seen as place that one may own, or might be renting, or leasing. This property belongs to him or her, and they have to right to make the rules. They feel safe in the confines of this place and know that they have a place to go when the world is asking for too much of them. One of the main points to remember is that there is a different level of territoriality, the primary territory, where a person claims a stake of ownership and is a place central to everyday living. Secondary territories, are places less central to survival. This place is generally open to the public, but is associated with specific neighborhoods, such as schools, gyms, post offices and so on. The last one is a public territory, this area is marked, owned, and police by someone else, but all can access them as long as he or she can obey the rules set by the governing entity. An example would be a sidewalk, a city pool or a park. Acquiring these territories contribute to a stable social order, they sharpen survival skills, increase security and predictability, and they also define individuals and groups (Encyclopedia of Applied Psychology. Oxford: Elsevier Science & Technology, 2004).

When one thinks of privacy, they might think of the ability to keep others away from knowledge they do not want shared, or from an area that they feel the same way. In this authors opinion this would be the correct definition, the ability of being secluded from the presence or view of others. In today’s life there are many things that one can rely on to be considered sacred, and when one looks at the way that earth has expanded in human growth over the decades, it is easy to see why privacy has become so important. Humans have the right to determine what is known by others and what they want to keep to themselves. “This regulation serves critical individual and inter-personal functions, because of its importance to effective functioning, privacy regulation is acknowledged as a “cultural universal,” meaning that every society has developed mechanisms so that individuals and groups can regulate interactions with others” (Encyclopedia of Applied Psychology. Oxford: Elsevier Science & Technology, 2004) Every Human can regulate what information they share, and this information will be dependant on the person or group with whom the information will be shared. For example, most humans will share information with close friends that he or she would...
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