The Effects of Headphones

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Loud music on headphones causes deafness by having a similar effect on nerves as MS Loud music played on earphones causes deafness by having a similar effect on nerves as multiple sclerosis (MS), scientists have learned. New research shows that noise levels above 110 decibels strip insulation from nerve fibres carrying signals from the ear to the brain. Loss of the protective coating, called myelin, disrupts electrical nerve signals. The same process, this time due to an attack from the immune system, damages nerves in the brain and results in MS. Loud noises are well known to lead to hearing problems such as temporary deafness or tinnitus (ringing in the ears). But this is the first time scientists have been able to identify the underlying damage to nerve cells. The findings are published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Lead researcher Dr Martine Hamann, from the University of Leicester, said "The research allows us to understand the pathway from exposure to loud noises to hearing loss. Dissecting the cellular mechanisms underlying this condition is likely to bring a very significant healthcare benefit to a wide population. The work will help prevention as well as progression into finding appropriate cures for hearing loss." The scientists found that myelin lost as a result of noise exposure regrows in time, meaning hearing can recover. "We now understand why hearing loss can be reversible in certain cases," Dr Hamann added. "We showed that the sheath around the auditory nerve is lost in about half of the cells we looked at, a bit like stripping the electrical cable linking an amplifier to the loudspeaker. The effect is reversible and after three months, hearing has recovered and so has the sheath around the auditory nerve." The work is part of ongoing research into the effects of loud noises on the cochlea nucleus, a brainstem region that receives sound signals from the inner ear. The team has already shown that damage to cells in the cochlea nucleus can cause tinnitus.

The effect of headset and earphone on reducing electromagnetic radiation from mobile phone toward human head ABSTRACT
Studies show that exposure to the electromagnetic wave for a certain period of time will leads to health problem such as headaches, or even worse, brain cancer. Scientist have known that this radiation might cause human biological damage through heating effects since human body is made up of approximately 65-70% water, electrolytes and ions. Radio frequency radiation emitted from mobile phone will interact with human body and interfere with human body's natural healing resulted displacement of electrolytes and ions within the body. This paper discussed on the analysis conducted to study the effect of electromagnetic radiation (thermal radiation) of mobile phones with different frequencies via experimental works. The experiment was conducted in a laboratory using a volunteer (human). The period of operation is 45 minutes as the talking time on the phone. Thermal imaging technique is used to monitor and capture the temperature distribution during the experimental analysis for every 5 minutes interval. Images will be collected and analyzed using graphical plot. Devices such as Bluetooth headset and earphone are also used to study either this equipment are effective to reduce the effect of thermal radiation toward human head or not. The result shows that mobile phone serving GSM 900 MHz has the highest temperature increment compare to mobile phone serving GSM 1800 MHz. It is also shown that GSM 900 MHz has greater thermal radiation effect or heating effect. By using Bluetooth headset and earphone device when talking via mobile phone, the result shows lower radiation since direct radiations from the mobile phone antenna was reduced.

Effects of Headset, Flight Workload, Hearing Ability, and Communications Message Quality on Pilot Performance

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