The Effects of Drinking Behavior on College Students’ Academic Performance

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The Effects of Drinking Behavior on College Students’ Academic Performance

Abstract
This study investigated the relationship between college students’ academic performance and their drinking behaviors. It was hypothesized that higher alcohol intake levels would be related to lower GPA. In the experiment, 28 Psychology students took an online survey which examined their level of alcohol intake in reference to their current grades. Current grades were measured by GPA and alcohol intake was based upon self-reported drinking frequency. Previous research supports the idea that poor academic performance is related to high alcohol intake. Background research supports the proposed hypothesis; however, the results found that alcohol intake had no significant relationship with academic performance.

The Effects of Drinking Behavior on College Students’ Academic Performance One who attends a college or university will at some point engage in the consumption of alcohol. It can be viewed as the college life, which is becoming a major issue on campuses. This is an issue because it is our country’s responsibility to ensure that undergraduate studies encourage increase knowledge and not discourage it. The environment of school in general may be too relaxed and peer behavior and pressures contribute to behavior that may be detrimental to one’s college career. Undergraduate studies should be a gateway to even higher learning and not a hindrance. The growing concern about this issue can be gauged by the national new media coverage of heavy drinking. Recent developments in government, higher education, and the public health community have led to greater public awareness and policies to address the problem (Lewis, 2005). It has been found that students; who participated in binge drinking drank or had a hangover more than once a week and had lower grade point averages (Taylor, Johnson, Voas & Turrisi, 2006).  In addition, it was noted that most students who did not enjoy learning or attending class; consumed alcohol at least once a month (Taylor, Johnson, Voas & Turrisi, 2006). Previous research has supported the hypothesis that higher alcohol intake is correlated with poor academic support. This study is unique because I wanted to see if this was true on a smaller scale. I decided to conduct a study at Old Dominion University using a sample of Psychology students. Though it has been found that poor academic performance is related to large alcohol consumption, I wanted to explore this finding on the campus of Old Dominion. Several studies have examined the effect of drinking behaviors and how they may be detrimental to college academic life. A national survey of nearly 37,000 students at 66 four-year institutions revealed a strong negative relationship between alcohol consumption and grades. Students with an A average consumed a little more than three drink per week, B students had almost five drinks, C students more than six, and D or F students reported nine drinks (Taylor, Johnson, Voas & Turrisi, 2006) Vaisman-Tzachor, R., & Lai, J. (2008). According to the results of the research conducted, these students were unable to maintain higher GPAs because of the amount of regular alcohol consumption. In the current study, we explored the relationship between drinking behavior and academic performance. It was hypothesized that students who participated in drinking activities on a regular basis would not receive satisfactory grades. Participants were asked to complete an online survey that was administered via www.surveygizmo.com. Each participant was expected to answer truthfully to each question in order to determine the amount of alcohol usage in relation to their academic performance. In study conducted by Croom and colleagues, it was found that prior knowledge regarding alcohol was not found to have a significant effect on alcohol related behaviors. In this study the control group,...
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