The Effectiveness of Acacia Leaves Extract in Killing Termites

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Acacia, Termite, Gum arabic
  • Pages : 13 (2840 words )
  • Download(s) : 1949
  • Published : March 11, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES
IV-A CALABARZON
Division of Rizal
District of Tanay II

SAMPALOC NATIONAL HIGHSCHOOL
SY: 2012-2013

A study on the effectiveness of acacia leaves decoction in killing termites

An investigatory project presented to
the Board of Judges

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Title Page……………………………………….. 1 Table of Contents………………………………..... 2 Introduction……………………………………….. 3 Statement of Problem……………………………. 4
Significance of the Study…………………………… 5 Scopes and Limitations……………………………. 6
Hypotheses ………………………………….. 7
Review of Related Literature…………………….. 8
Methodology………………………………… 9
Result………………………………………. 10
Discussion……………………………………… 11
Conclusions……………………………………… 12 Recommendations………………………………… 13
Acknowledgement …………………………………. 14 Reference/ Bibliography ………………………….. 15 Abstract ………………………………………. 16 Introduction

Acacia is a Tropical tree that is Abundant here in our country, it is a source of wood that can be used as furniture, shelter and other wood materials. And it also used in folk medicine at19th-century Ethiopian medical text describes a potion made from an Ethiopian species of Acacia (known as grar) mixed with the root of the tacha, then boiled, as a cure for rabies and there are over 1,300 species of Acacia tree. Acacia isa genus of shrubs and trees belonging to the subfamily Mimosoideae of the family Fabaceae, first described in Africa by the Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus in 1773. Many non-Australian species tend to be thorny, whereas the majority of Australian acacias are not. They are pod-bearing, with sap and leaves typically bearing large amounts of tannins and condensed tannins that historically in many species found use as pharmaceuticals and preservatives. The generic name derives from ακακία (akakia), the name given by early Greek botanist-physician Pedanius Dioscorides (ca. 40-90) to the medicinal tree A. nilotica in his book Materia Medica.[2] This name derives from the Greek word for its characteristic thorns, ακις (akis, thorn).[3] The species name nilotica was given by Linnaeus from this tree's best-known range along the Nile river.

Acacias are also known as thorntrees, whistling thorns or wattles.

The genus Acacia previously contained roughly 1300 species, about 960 of them native to Australia, with the remainder spread around the tropical to warm-temperate regions of both hemispheres, including Europe, Africa, southern Asia, and the Americas. However, in 2005 the genus was divided into five separate genera under

the tribe "Acacieae." The genus Acacia was retained for the majority of the Australian species and a few in tropical Asia, Madagascar and Pacific Islands. Most of the species outside Australia, and a small number of Australian species, were reclassified into Vachellia and Senegalia. The two final genera, Acaciella and Mariosousa, each contain about a dozen species from the Americas.

Termites digest there own and eat small pieces of woods, paper and other materials that containing cellulose. They destroy much furniture and farmers crops. Subterranean termites are the most destructive kind of termite. They can eat a lot of wood and they can cause a lot of expensive damage to a house! They can destroy building foundations, wooden support beams, plastic plumbing pipes, sub-flooring, insulation even swimming pool liners and filtration systems! Termites can also injure or destroy living trees and shrubs. Subterranean termites need contact with the soil to survive. They live in underground colonies or in wet areas aboveground. They build tunnels to reach food and every spring, groups of reproductive termites fly off to start new colonies.

With this study, the researcher would like to find out the effectiveness of acacia leaves decoction in killing termites....
tracking img