The Effect of Coke for Coughing

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Saint Jude Catholic School
High School Department

“The Effect of Coke with Lemon and Ginger as a Medicine for Coughs and Colds”

In Partial Fulfillments
of the Requirements in
BIOLOGY
1st Quarter

Submitted by:
15 See, Adrian

Submitted to:
Mr. Jun dela Bajan
July 29 ,2011

I. Statement of the Problem
Cold and coughs are the most common diseases. Medicines are very expensive. Coke mixed together with lemon, and ginger can relieve coughs and colds.

II. Statement of the Objectives
1) To determine effectiveness of coke mixed with ginger as a cough or cold reliever. 2) To determine whether coke, lemon, and ginger is more or less effective than medicine in relieving coughs and colds. 3) To determine if coke and ginger will relieve or worsen cough and colds.

III. Significance of the Problem
This study will be able to help save money on buying medicines for coughs and colds. It will help people to relieve the most common diseases with an easy mixture of coke, lemon, and ginger. This study will help parents in giving medicine to their children. Some medicines have a bitter taste, but when the kids realize that they will be taking coke as a medicine, they will surely drink. Colds and coughs are the most common diseases and they spread very fast, without a strong immune system, people can get these diseases.

IV. Review of Related Literature
Introduction
➢ Liquid medicines are flavored to mask the unpleasant taste of the drugs they contain. That's an obvious advantage for any product sold over the counter, so many patent medicine manufacturers added flavoring to their nostrums in the 19th and early 20th centuries. They weren’t working with the synthetic drugs we have today, but the herb-based ingredients in the old patent medicines weren’t particularly palatable either. A common practice was to dissolve the plants in alcohol and flavor them with a sweet syrup. Fletcher’s Castoria, a children’s stomachache remedy, used wintergreen flavoring. The sticky sweetness of Coca-Cola masked cocaine and caffeine, both bitter substances.

But many cough medicines in those days were cherry-flavored, and their names said so. Wistar’s Balsam of Wild Cherry, for example, was sold as a remedy for respiratory problems, as was Dr. Swayne’s Compound Syrup of Wild Cherry. Of course, it wasn’t the cherry flavor that cured the cough, but opium. Interestingly, an 1858 ad for Dr. Swayne’s says nothing about opium, although it was legal at the time; Dr. Swayne may have sensed even then that putting a narcotic into your product wasn't something you wanted to brag about. The fact is, however, that opiates do wonders for coughs; codeine is widely prescribed for serious coughs to this day.

There's no good reason cough medicine can't be kiwi- or banana-flavored or have other flavors. But according to Andrew Rosenthal, Pharm.D., cherry's advantages are that it's effective at masking bitter drugs, plus it's cheap and easy to make. If you really can't stand the taste, pharmacies such as CVS and Walgreens can provide other flavors for liquid meds on request. I don't claim you'll like them any better, but at least you'll have a change of pace.

Cough
➢ A cough s a sudden and often repetitively occurring reflex which helps to clear the large breathing passages from secretions, irritants, foreign particles and microbes. The cough reflex consists of three phases: an inhalation, a forced exhalation against a closed glottis, and a violent release of air from the lungs following opening of the glottis, usually accompanied by a distinctive sound.[1] Coughing can happen voluntarily as well as involuntarily. ➢ Frequent coughing usually indicates the presence of a disease. Many viruses and bacteria benefit evolutionarily by causing the host to cough, which helps to spread the disease to new hosts. Most of the time, coughing is caused by a respiratory tract infection but can be triggered by...
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