The Effect of Anaerobic Aerobic and Alactic Exercise on the Skills of Badminton

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Abstract
The major racket sports include badminton, squash, table tennis and tennis. The growth of sports science and the commercialization of racket sports in recent years have focused attention on improved performance and this has led to a more detailed study and understanding of all aspects of racket sports. The aim here, therefore, is to review recent developments of the application of motor skills to racket sports specifically on badminton. It is evident that a great deal of scientific endeavor has been applied to Badminton, but this is variable across both the racket sports and the scientific disciplines. A scientific approach has helped to: implement training programs to improve players’ fitness; guide players in nutritional and psychological preparation for play; inform players of the strategy and tactics used by themselves and their opponents; provide insight into the technical performance of skills; understand the effect of equipment on play; and accelerate the recovery from racket-arm injuries. Badminton provides a good model for investigating the interplay between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism and the effect of nutrition, heat and fatigue on performance. Badminton requires the performance of work in the nature of sprints, stops and starts, jumps, leaps, lunges, rapid changes of direction, twists and turns and a variety of strokes.' To become an elite badminton athlete, the fitness requirement is quite specific. Over the past few years, badminton as played in Asia has focused a greater emphasis on fitness, especially in terms of speed and recovery powers. Exercise is a beneficial and efficient way to improve one’s health status. Numerous studies have looked at both the physiological and psychological health benefits of physical exercise. this paper defines the relationship and effect between Aerobic exercise, Altaic, Anaerobic exercise and badminton skills.

1.Introduction
Badminton requires the performance of work in the nature of sprints, stops and starts, jumps, leaps, lunges, rapid changes of direction, twists and turns and a variety of strokes.' To become an elite badminton athlete, the fitness requirement is quite specific. Over the past few years, badminton as played in Asia has focused a greater emphasis on fitness, especially in terms of speed and recovery powers. Exercise is a beneficial and efficient way to improve one’s health status. Numerous studies have looked at both the physiological and psychological health benefits of physical exercise; this paper defines the relationship and effect of aerobic exercise, anaerobic exercise on badminton player and his skills. Physical exercise produces a wide variety of health benefits. People who are physically active substantially lower their risk for coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, hypertension, Type II diabetes, overweight and obesity, osteoporosis, and deterioration of their functional capacity (Vuori, 2000). These health benefits are highly predictable, dose-dependent, and generalizable to a wide range of population groups (Vuori, 2000). Aerobic exercise, or endurance exercise, is a subdivision of physical exercise that improves cardiovascular and respiratory health. Additionally, it is generally assumed to increase well-being and reduce negative mood states such as anxiety and depression (A. Byrne & D. Byrne, 1993). During aerobic exercise, a person rhythmically contracts his large muscle groups to move his body against gravity (Morgan & Goldston, 1987). At the moderate level, a person will produce a slight increase in his breathing and heart rate. At the vigorous level, a person will produce a large increase in his breathing and heart rate.

1.2 What is Badminton?
Badminton is a racquet sport played by either two opposing players (singles) or two opposing pairs (doubles). The players or pairs take positions on opposite halves of a rectangular court that is divided by a net. Unlike many racket sports, badminton...
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