The Eagle

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You’ll always find in Alfred’s poems that he uses nature as a symbol for humans, and this is interesting. One of his poems is called “The eagle”, in this poem Alfred is talking about an eagle and the world around him, but what he’s really talking about is humans. The eagle poem has 2 stanzas, each one has 3 lines. Thought it’s a very short poem but it has very deep meanings and it’s a very popular poem. Line 1:

* From how Alfred indicates to the eagle we know that the eagle is a male. * He “clasps” the eagle is holding tightly to the rock, but it’s not just a normal rock. If you search for the word “crag” , you’ll find that it means the sharp rocks in the part of a cliff which comes out from the main body of large rocks. And theses rocks are hard to access. It’s like if the poet is saying that we cannot reach the eagle. * The way how the poet describes how the eagle is holding into the “crag” saying “crooked hands” instead of “crooked claws” it tells that the poet wants the eagle to be a kind of a reference to humans. * Using the strong sound /ka/ in the words [clasps, crag, crooked] enhances the symbol of power. Line 2:

* “Close to the sun” this shows that the eagle is too far and high in the sky that he seems in the same height as the sun. * “Lonely lands” as if the eagle has reached a level of highness where no one can reach. But isn’t the eagle so up in the sky that he seems very near to the sun? Then why did the poet say “lands”, and why did he say “lonely”? Usually eagles aren’t sociable creatures and if they get lonely then they should stay in swarms.

Line 3:
* “Ringed” the eagle is surrounded only by the blue skies, but this is what the eagle sees. Because if someone looked to the eagle from down they will see the rocks too. * Using the word “stands” is another thing that represents that the poet is using the eagle as a reference for humans, because we usually use the word “perches” for birds. The first stanza from this...
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