The Dustbowl of America in the 1930's.

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The Dustbowl of America in the 1930’s
The Dust Bowl of North America was a disaster in the early 1930's when huge parts of the Midwestern and Western farmlands of America became wastelands. This happened due to a series of dry years, which agreed, with the extension of agriculture in unsuitable lands. Droughts and dust storms caused by poor labor practice troubled farms and ranches of the Great Plains; causing a great migration of its people to other, more fertile, lands. The problem had become so great that a nation wide effort was made to resolve the problem. In 1935, big efforts were made by both federal and state governments to develop suitable programs for soil conservation and for the recovery of the dust bowl. Eventually farming became possible again in the Dust Bowl so farmers have learned many lessons from this. The European settlers, who first arrived at the Great Plains, found strong grasslands that held the fine-grained soil in place in spite of the long regular droughts and occasional heavy rains. A large number of the travelers settled down in this area and built farms and ranches. These lands used led to soil exposure and great erosion. The cattle ranches were very pleasing for the settlers; this led to overgrazing and humiliation of the soil. Farmers began to plow the natural grass cover and plant their own crops. Without the original root systems of the grass to anchor the soil, much of it blew away. The wide row crops were very dreadful because between the crops, the land was kept bare; as a result, this area was open to the elements. The Great Plains are a vast area of land located east of the Rocky Mountains in North America. Precipitation in the region is sparse because it is found in the rain shadow of the Rockies. The lack of water created a hard dry soil that was very difficult to farm for agricultural reasons. The farmers continued to develop the land and eventually disaster struck. The natural foundations caused disaster on the bare...