The Doctrine of the Last Things

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Christian eschatology, Book of Revelation, Last Judgment
  • Pages : 12 (4352 words )
  • Download(s) : 32
  • Published : October 31, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Illinois Theological Seminary

An Examination of Methods
For Evaluating the Doctrine of the Last Things

A Research Paper
Submitted to Rev. Jose Oliveira
For Biblical Anthropology

In Partial Fulfillment
Of The Masters of Divinity Degree
In The Illinois Theological Seminary

By
Henri Dormevil

Dacula, Ga
October 28, 2011

Contents

The Doctrine of the Last Things……….…… ………………………………….………..……………1 Introduction……………………………… ……………………….…………. ……………..……….2 Eschatology in Philosophy and Religion…………………………..……..….…………......…………..3 Eschatology in the History of the Christian Church………………..……………………....……..…….4 The Relation of Eschatology to the Rest of Dogmatic…….….……….……..…………….……………5 The Name of “Eschatology”……………..…………..…………………………………….…………….6 The Contents of Eschatology: General and Individual Eschatology....……….……………..…….…….7 Individual Eschatology…………………………………………………………………………………..8 Death…………………………………………………………………………………………………….9 Intermediate State………………………………………………………………………………………10 Resurrection…………………………………………………………………………………………….11 Judgment……………………………………………………………………………………………….12 Conclusion………………………………………………………………………………………..…….13 Works Cited……………………………………………………………………………….……………14

Introduction
Eschatology is one of the most important subjects in our Christian faith. As believers we are saved by hope, hope for a future centered in a predestined Person, Jesus Christ, not in a pre-written program. But we have seen that the shape of that future is distorted when the problems of a particular period lead us to fashion a system we then impose upon the Bible to support a chart of events, so that hope changes its focus from the Savior ever with us to the supposed signs of the times of His Coming. This is a study of systematic theology as it pertains to the doctrines relating to the end of the age. And without any doubt that it is important to note that this is a rather controversial area among evangelicals. Nevertheless we need not feel that we must accept any concepts in their en-tirety if we can scripturally justify our own point of view. But we must develop some framework for approaching Scripture and the issues involving the Second Coming of Christ. The below fol-lowing subjects are a suggested framework to help us begin to think through issues surrounding this event that is so often spoken of in the Old and New Testament.

Eschatology in Philosophy and Religion
A doctrine of the last things is not something that is strange to the Christian religion. My daughter Jenny who is sixteen now always raised the questions, “what is the final destiny of my life.” “Do I perish at death, or do I enter upon another state of existence.” Naturally, I always tell that her that as long as you believe that the history of the world had a beginning, it will also have an end you are right with God. I don’t think she has a clue about what I mean. Maybe some phi-losophers might have a better answer. Plato taught the immortality of the soul, that is, its continued existence after death, and this doctrine remained an important tenet in philosophy up to the present time. Spinoza had no place for it in his pantheistic system, but Wolff and Leibnitz defended it with all kinds of argu-ments. Kant stressed the untenableness of these arguments, but nevertheless retained the doctrine of immortality as a postulate of practical reason. The idealistic philosophy of the nineteenth cen-tury ruled it out. In fact, as Haering says, "Pantheism of all sorts is limited to a definite [1] 1 John McIn-tyre, Systematic Theology Part 2, Bibliolife (October 9, 2009) mode of contemplation, and does not lead to any 'ultimate'." Not only did the philosophers reflect on the future of the individual; they also thought deeply on the future of the world. The Stoics spoke of successive world-cycles, and the Buddhists, of world-ages, in each of which a new world appears and again disappears. Even Kant speculated on the birth and death of worlds. As everybody...
tracking img