The Difference Between Associate Degree and Baccalaureate Degree in Nursing

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The Difference Between Associate Degree and Baccalaureate Degree in Nursing

Increasing clinical understanding and the rising complexities in the health care technologies today requires that professional nurses be educated and competent to the baccalaureate level. Nurses with their RN can be educated to the level of associates degree or to baccalaureate degree. According to the Grand Canyon University Baccalaureate Curriculum Model, the associates degree level nurse differs from the baccalaureate level nurse in three main competencies; client, nurse, and nursing education. One of the different competencies between associate degree (ADN) and Baccalaureate degree (BSN) is type of client or patients they are prepared to treat and the care setting which they are allowed to work in. “ADN nurses are educated to provide nursing care to persons with similar health alterations in structured setting, whereas BSN-prepared nurses are educated to engage in independent thinking and to provide nursing care to persons with complex and differing health alterations within a variety of settings, including the community” (Hood, 2010, pg. 18). Health care is not only centered as inpatient hospitals but throughout the community as preventive care as well, leaving ADN nurses in a disadvantage. Nurses now a day have to be able to practice across multiple settings. Contrasting the graduates of an ADN program with the graduate of a BSN program; the BSN nurse is prepared to practice in all health care settings; ER, critical care, public health, community health, and mental health. Another difference in competency between the ADN and BSN is the type of expertise and skillfulness each nurse develops. Some skills like communicating and assessing are shared between ADN and BSN nurses. Others are not like spiritual perspective, liberal/critical thinking, and leading/managing are not. Some of that curriculum is in the Grand Canyon University philosophy of nursing which focuses on spiritual...
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