The Deviant Behavior of Our Justice System

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The Deviant Behavior of our Justice System

The United States Criminal Justice system has changed so much over the years it’s hard to know what’s legal and what’s not. After the Constitution was written in 1787, our nation now had laws and rights that were to be enacted and enforced throughout the entire United States. With these laws and rights, people had to become smarter and know what they were allowed to do and what they weren’t. Lawyers, judges, police officers, and many others, had to become familiar with every word the constitution stated. We were growing, and we needed regulations to form our criminal justice system. Today, our criminal justice system is made up of many people and various departments, people, institutions, etc., some of which are good and others that are flawed. There are many leaders trying to run our system with not enough followers, this allows for many mistakes and problems which have risen in today’s society. Although there are many arguments, for or against different protests, one of that has brought much attention to our criminal justice system is immigration. According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, the definition of an illegal immigrant is: a person who comes to a country to take up permanent residence. From what we see and know, our nation was founded by immigrants and we are still flooded with an abundance of illegal and legal immigrants. With an estimated population of over 300 million people in the United States, 11 million of those are immigrants. (“Reuters”) The problem with this is our criminal justice system says we have to deport all illegal immigrants and keep them from coming into our nation, but, we barely ever deport these people and we don’t do a good enough job keeping immigrants from coming into the United States. Ironically, when we do kick out illegal immigrants or prevent them from coming into the U.S., they find another way in and the cat ‘n’ mouse game continues. There have been many arguments and debates on these issues, and ironically one man who has put a lot of heat on our government is Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio. He is most commonly known as the “toughest Sheriff in the nation” and has earned that title with years of harsh treatment to his prisoners within his county. Arizona has been an open door over the years for many Mexican immigrants coming into the United States and no one has done much to stop it. Crimes were on the rise and enough was enough so Arizona started to make its own laws about how immigrants should be treated and handled. Led by Sheriff Arpaio, Arizona gained huge recognition for its so called “bravery” stance up to the government who wouldn’t listen to Arizona’s cries before. After this gained national attention, the Government started to listen and plead with Arizona. On June 25, 2012, Arizona received its partial victory over the government allowing them to enforce most of its “Arizona only” laws and continue to crackdown on illegal immigrants coming into and through its shared border with Mexico. Although many people are not happy with Arizona’s views and handling of Mexicans, I feel the government was more to blame for not stepping in to help when Arizona was screaming for help. It’s an ongoing battle still being fought but I feel Arizona still has the upper hand. Another topic putting stress on our criminal justice system is “school violence”. Ever since the Columbine shooting in the late 1990’s, school violence has been a serious subject. Schools were no longer safe and people had to worry about guns, bullying, and many other acts of violence, potentially going on or going to happen at some point. Parents and teachers wanted answers from our government and they wanted them now! Our book states, “Despite its horror, school killing is extremely rare.” (Thio 460) As we have seen lately in Connecticut, this is wrong and it’s becoming common. The big...
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