The Destructive Nature of Greed

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The Destructive Nature of Greed
Upon first glance at “The Rocking Horse Winner” by D.H. Lawrence, one would not expect the said winner to in fact lose his life. The irony in the title gives way to the theme of the story, being that greed is destructive; even of life itself. Lawrence uses elements such as plot, point of view, and characters to further portray the destructive nature of greed in the story.

A plot is the events that flow together to make a story. The first event in a story is the exposition, in which the characters, setting, and theme are introduced. The first character introduced in the story is the mother, Hester, who is obsessed with being wealthy and has no love for her family. The next major character introduced is Paul, who wants nothing more than for his mother to love him. The story takes place in London, most likely in the middle of the 1920’s, since the story was published in 1926. The theme of greed is introduced early on in the story with the mother and further exaggerated when the house begins repeating the haunting phrase, “there must be more money” (560). This is also an instance of foreshadowing as it alludes to the destruction that greed will cause.

The next event in the plot is the complicating incident, or problem. The complicating incident in this story is that the mother, who does not love her family, and the father, who is not spoken about in length, enjoy living a lifestyle they cannot afford. Their problem is their need for more money to be satisfied. The rising action of the story is when Uncle Oscar learns that Paul is betting money on horses and winning large amounts. This leads up to the technical climax when Hester finds Paul rocking furiously on his horse. Paul “fell to the ground… unconscious” and was injured seriously (568).

The falling action in the story is the time when Paul lies ill in bed yet Bassett places his money on Malabar, whom Paul is sure will win. Malabar wins the Derby and Paul makes “over...
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