The Desire of the Everlasting Hills

Continues for 2 more pages »
Read full document

The Desire of the Everlasting Hills

By | October 2011
Page 1 of 3
The meaning Thomas Cahill attributes to the title of the book he wrote: The Desire of the Everlasting Hills isn’t what I expected. Having taken this phrase from Jacob’s blessing for Joseph, Cahill elaborates his thoughts “Is not the desire of the everlasting hills that they be saved from their everlastingness, that something new happen, that the everlasting cycle of human cruelty, of man’s inhumanity to man, be brought to an end?”(8) I would imagine that the Everlasting Hills could also represent Heaven and the desire for them representative of the desperate need to experience never-ending perfect second life. Beyond the meaning of the title, Cahill’s foremost concern is to ask and thoroughly examine the question: Does the life and death of Jesus make a difference, not only for Christians, but also in our entire world. Whether he believes Jesus is God and is our savior or not, he doesn’t try to explain. The conclusion he does reach is that Jesus is the cause of everything we believe about right and wrong, and therefore is involved in every decision made and woven into our lives regardless of our beliefs. It seems appropriate for Cahill to spend so much time telling the history of the Greeks, Jews, and Romans because there is no doubt how connected and influenced they are by each other. Cahill begins with the story of Alexander the Great. In detail he explains how Alexander came into power. He also emphasizes the relationship between Alexander and his mother. This reminded me of how important Jesus’ relationship with Mary was. Cahill address Mary’s relationship with Jesus more, later in the book. In giving a rather brief history lesson, Cahill describes the beginning of Hellenizing. After telling the rise and fall of Alexander the Great Cahill writes about a familiar player in the Jewish and Roman history: Judas Maccabeus. I didn’t know the full extent of the revolt led by Judas before reading the book. The story somewhat reminded me of the movie 300. Cahill...
Hide

Rate this document

What do you think about the quality of this document?

Share this document

Let your classmates know about this document and more at Studymode.com