The Desire of Holiness

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The Desire of Holiness
ENG/493
April 1, 2014

The Desire of Holiness
An analysis of how the desire of holiness influenced the society in the Middle Ages, and how the expression of desires was limited by the social structures, is based on The English Bible, and the First Letter of Saint Paul to the Corinthians. Three different translations of Chapter 13, written by theologians during the sixteenth century are compared in this work, to differentiate the interpretations of the Holy Scriptures, and how religious principles were present in medieval life. To have a wide understanding of the desire of holiness, is convenient to know the etymology of the word “holy”, what it means. Holy is considered the most divine word in Scripture, its origin and significance lead us into Deity and its enigmatic concept. Holy is an idea of God difficult to describe. The word Gadosh in Hebrew language is uncertain, its root could be from “to shine”, or Arabian "to cut or separate". Even its connotation is flawless, different opinions persist about this word and its connection to God. The glory is exclusive of God and He is above His Creation. Consequently in antagonism to everything that is created, Moses exclaimed: "Who is like Thee among the gods? Who is like Thee glorious in holiness?" (Exodus xv. ii). God told to Isaiah: "To whom will ye liken Me, or shall I be equal? saith the Holy One" (Isaiah xl. 25). Consequently God's greatness over His creation, and above everything that is not Him, is correlated with His holiness. Ernest Neville says that Goodness "is not an entity - a thing. It is a law determining the relation between things; relations", he adds, "which have to be realized by free-wills."[2] The Problem of Evil, p. 17. Therefore, God’s holiness is, “His fixed determination to maintain intact the relationship or the order that ought to reign among all beings that exist and to preserve intact His own position relative to free beings. "This, too, finds support from Old Testament usage. Initially, what was set apart for God's service was regarded as holy, and so the point of belonging to God constituted a person or a thing holy.” (Finlayson, trans. 1955, p. 3-4). The desire of holiness contrasts with the human condition ruled by goodness and sin. In the Middles Ages, .multiple conflicts in Europe have their roots in selfishness, and the ambition of power. The people of England were suffering the effects of oppression and abuse of the feudal system that had prevailed for years. Peasants only had few rights and the retribution for their work was minimum. Their situation was deplorable. They did not have access to education, and there was no possibility to be part of the novelty, or occupy an important position in the king’s court, unless there was an exception. The lack of human rights caused an increasing conflict with the procedures of politic, and religious institutions. These were ineffective and had no interest in the development and progress of the poor. Just the aristocrats and influent members of the government could enjoy the privileges of the wealthy and comfortable life. Political and religious authorities were intimately related, and their objectives were the same: govern, upheld the control of the economy, and get profits. They ruled against the benefit of common people and their communities. In the 1520s there was an avid desire of holiness, it was essential to stop the decadency of ethics and recover the confidence in priests and politicians. Theologians and reformers began to denounce significant aspects of the English political and religious structures. They wanted to expose the faults of the church, and its impact in social structures. According to "The Norton Anthology of English Literature Norton Topics Online" (2010 - 2014), “Martin Luther, an Augustinian monk and professor of theology at the University of Wittenberg in Germany, challenged the authority of the Pope and attacked several key...
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