The Dependence on Technology vs. Human Resourcefulness

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  • Topic: Battle of Isandlwana, Anglo-Zulu War, Martini-Henry
  • Pages : 3 (824 words )
  • Download(s) : 2364
  • Published : January 6, 2011
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Ever since I had moved into the open and
competitive market, I’ve seen it highly
influenced by “modern” culture, dependent
on “high tech” technological advancement.
I can clearly point the big changes that took
over our biggest asset – The human
resource, which as a progressive society we
are moving towards losing its biggest value.
Coming from a small country like Israel,
where I was taught that the human
resource is the most important and the most invested asset when it comes to training, skills and knowledge, I was amazed to find out that almost everything in our “modern” societies comes in forms of “packages” promising the “short way” to success, or that people are looking to buy knowledge in a form of a secret pill, or some kind of a “kit” that will do the work for them. This of course is a total contradiction of what they should actually look for in any type of acquired knowledge offered. It seems that we had passed a stage form the old school of thought. As society today is striving to the fast, most accessible and easiest way to get their results instead of the plain old school methods of resourcefulness and ingenuity based on real need for solutions that true warriors and leaders had used successfully throughout history. ~ Knowledge and skills based on experience are powerful. Don’t try depending on technology only! ~

“Determination and Fearlessness”
In the historic Battle of Isandlwana 1879 the Zulu warriors fought against the British forces, we have a great example of a “Modern” and technological advanced army (The British forces) that is defeated by an inferior army which is considered “primitive” (The Zulu), which was based only on the human asset and warriors skills.

This is the history in a brief: The story of the African resistance in 1879 as the British soldiers said "They fight like lions and not afraid of death”… We go back to January 22nd, 1879 to the Zulu victory over the British...
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