The Debate of Hunting

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The Debate of Hunting
Leonardo Chavez
com220
September, 12, 2010
Matt Ray

The Debate of Hunting
Even though hunting should not be a sport, hunting helps maintain a healthy herd and promotes land, wildlife conservation. Because without hunting herds will over populate and become sick from starvation or spread disease. Hunters are a major supporter and play a big part in wildlife management.

People for many years have debated about, hunting as a sport, or if it is only a means of people shooting at living targets. There can be many that say hunting is a part of American culture, how it benefits animal wildlife and also land conservation. Others say it is just a form of cruelty to animals and there are no benefits in hunting. “Encouragement of a proper hunting spirit, a proper love of sport, instead of being incompatible with the love of nature and wild things, offering the best guaranty for the preservation of wild things” (Theodore Roosevelt U.S. President). How hunting is cruel and that hunting has no place in the 21st century and is becoming evident by hunters waste and destruction of wildlife. In the past people used hunting as a means of supplying hunters and their families with food. Today animal activist say that hunting is not necessary and has no place in today’s society. “Hunting is not a sport, in a sport; both sides should know they’re in the game (Paul Rodriguez). In the last hundred years the United States has been going through a transformation out of the necessity to providing food and safety through recreational activity. There was a time when a majority of people lived in rural areas. Since then, the majority live in urban areas and this meant a change in people’s lifestyle. The change in people’s lifestyle brought the need to form organizations to protect animal rights. With this change many new animal rights organizations were formed such as People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) and others to join in protecting wildlife from hunters. Animal activist argue that hunting: “In all cases, sport hunting inflicts undeniable cruelty- pain, trauma, wounding, and death- on living, sentient creatures. Most civilized and caring people will believe that causing suffering and death is by definition inhumane, regardless of method” (Miller, 2009). Some hunting is for the purpose of who can obtain the biggest trophy. In the 1950s’ an organization named the Humane Society of the United States organized to help in the protection of cruelty to wildlife animals. Therefore, in the 70s’ a group of students from Oxford decided to argue: “whether the moral status of nonhuman animals was necessarily inferior to that of human beings and whether animals should be entitled to their own basic rights and protection by law” (Laney, 2008 ). Then in the 80s’ many film productions, news articles, books were portraying that all hunters came from low class and uneducated people. Hunters today began to see themselves being portrayed as nothing more than a bunch of rednecks running through the woods with guns and wearing plaid, killing helpless animals. The NRA [National Rifle Association] caps and says in a 2004 New York Times article by a woman who stated “let’s go out and kill some defenseless animals” (Laney, 2008). Animal activist say that trophy hunting by Americans are responsible for killing tens of thousands of wild animals in other countries. In fact in 1997 the Smithsonian Institution’s received a donation of $20 million from a big game hunter named Kenneth Behring to solicit a permit, to allow the remains of two endangered sheep be allowed to be brought back to the United States under the (ESA) Endangered Species Act to aid in the research, and helping their survival. After they received bad publicity the Institute decided to avoid obtaining the permit. All though many are surprised to find that the facts on how hunting and outdoors sportsmen promote land and wildlife conservation. Hunting for...
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