The Death Penalty

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Table of Contents

The Paper Outline…………………….Pages 1-2

The Abstract.......................................Page 3-4

Introduction:
The Death Penalty at a Glance..........Page 5

Paper Proper:
The Abolition of the Death Penalty...............................................Pages 6-11

Conclusion....................................…..Page 12

Bibliography................................…....Page 13

Paper Outline

I. The death penalty is a form of capital punishment. It is the legal infliction of death as a result of committing a heinous crime.

II. Death penalty has been with society ever since the emergence of formal communities. Examples are stoning to death, hanging and other primitive forms of attaining justice for any crime. [more examples]

III. The principle of Lex Talionis is often regarded to as the expression an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth

a. This does not only mean taking something of equal value for something lost. It can also apply to providing an appropriate punishment for a certain crime committed.

b. The system of Lex Talionis when properly applied provides a formal and fair system of justice however it is still not ideal.

IV. The death penalty is often said to be a form of deterrent. A deterrent is something used for preventive purposes however others say it is more of a legal form of revenge than a deterrent.

a. Some sources say that crime rates decrease slightly when death penalty is in effect.

b. Other sectors argue that the death penalty does nothing significantly to lower crime rates. More often than not, some sources say that death penalty also acts as a catalyst to a chain reaction of crimes.

V. Death penalty serves as an excessive expenditure with very little assurance of actually being served as a punishment.

. Death penalty is subject to committing wrongful convictions.

a. In the United States alone, there have been 130 people rejected from death row due to wrongful convictions since 1973. In 2003, 10 were released from death row.

b. There is no way of eliminating the possibility of human error in investigations. VII. Death penalty is subject to several biases which may lead to a wrong accusation

a. In today’s society it is the rich that have most of the power hence the poor are subject to being framed. Plus most crimes involving the lower class are often forgotten and are often hurriedly investigated.

b. In a recent study, it has been concluded that African-American defendants receive the death penalty three times more than Caucasians in cases involving white victims. This supports the bias involving race.

VIII. The governments of pro-death penalty nations continually defend this punishment for they believe that it is the equivalent for a lost life. They also point out that errors can be lessened if not eliminated frominvestigations through improvements and innovations in technology.

The Abstract

The death penalty can be defined as a legal infliction of death to someone who has been proven guilty of doing a heinous crime. It is a form of capital punishment that has been constantly scrutinized especially in countries of mostly Christian or Catholic Faith. And, the Philippines being one of those countries has not been an avid supporter of the punishment for all crimes but only gives out the said punishment only to special circumstances depending on the intensity of the crime.

The researcher believes that though the death penalty has its perks it is subject to too much error to be legalized completely in the country. Hence, the researcher designed this paper as to prove why the death penalty should be abolished.

In this paper, the researcher probes into the various reasons why the death penalty proves to be unreliable starting with the death penalty’s constant possibility to be affected to various biases...
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