The Death of Newspapers

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Since the turn of the new century, newspapers have always been the main source of our news. For years, it started the day for millions. Along with a cup of coffee, maybe even some breakfast, the arrival of the morning paper meant the beginning to the daily grind. Nowadays the evening paper is long extinct, especially in large cities. With Internet so available to the masses and, for the most part, providing free news, the newspaper is no longer a necessity. The newspaper becoming extinct is beneficial because it is more environmentally friendly, is more of a convenience, and has given voice to countless talented people who would otherwise have no platform. Lets take a look at the newspaper from an environmental point of view. Nearly four billion trees worldwide are cut down annually for paper alone, representing about thirty-five percent of all harvested trees (Lukenbill 1). Each person alone in the United States uses almost eight hundred pounds of paper per year that adds up to almost two hundred billion pounds per year for our entire population. World paper consumption has grown four hundred percent in the last forty years. With the newspaper industry consuming almost ten percent of all trees the downfall of newspapers would be very environmentally friendly (Lukenbill 2). The United States Toxic Release Inventory Report released by the EPA states that pulp and paper mills are among the worst polluters to air, water, and land of any industry in the country. Not only do the mills pollute but also distributing all the newspaper copies to newsstands and homes, then trucking them back to recycling center or landfills creates even more. The end result, according to a 2006 report, sates newspaper sales account for almost sixteen percent of all carbon emissions (Koerner 1). Not only does the downfall of newspapers save trees but also creates less pollution. Some may try to argue the fact that the servers and desktops used to make online newspapers possible are on par...
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