The Cuban Revolution

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The Cuban Revolution

Name :
School : St. John's College
Territory : Belize
School Code :
Student Number :
Teacher :
Year of Exam : 2011
Topic : The Cuban Revolution

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements 3
Rational 4
Research Question 5
Research Essay 6
Appendix 14
Bibliography 17

Acknowledgements
The researcher would like to thank all those who aided him in the construction of this research paper. He would like to thank his history teacher , for providing him with information pertaining to the history of the Caribbean in particular Cuba. He would also like to thank the librarians of the St. John’s College library directing and recommending books which helped in the research essay.

Rational
During the early days of the Caribbean, Cuba was one of the most powerful colonies in the region. Its economic dominance during the time came from its exports such as sugar, tobacco, coffee and other goods. The income that came from these exports remained in the colony, rather than being sent straight to the mother country. This allowed Cuba to become one of the most developed colonies in the Caribbean with the most developed city at the time, Havana. However, this was more than 500 years before the Cuban Revolution. Why was this powerful country forced to take up arms against its own government, that was so close to the economic powerhouse knows as the U.S.A? What were the factors that led to this revolution and when did they originate? How did this revolution unfold? These are the questions that have motivated the researcher to undertake a thorough research for answers.

Research Question

What were the factors that led to the Cuban Revolution and when did they originate?

Research Essay
The day was July 26, 1953. A group of approximately 135 rebels, led by Fidel Castro (Appx.1) and his brother Raul Castro Ruz (Appx.2) assaulted the Moncada Barracks (Appx.3) in the Santiago de Cuba Province (Appx.4). Although the attacked was poorly executed, and the aftermath landed both leaders in jail, it has become widely accepted as the beginning of the Cuban Revolution; an armed revolt that led to the overthrow of the corrupt dictator, Flugencio Batista (Appx5). However, the roots of this revolution date back almost a century from the day. What were these roots that led the prosperous country of Cuba (Appx.6), which had so much success in the colonial era, to take up arms against its government? Its economy by the 18th and 19th century, after the fall of Haiti, led Cuba to become one of the powerhouse colonies, economically, in the Caribbean. Then again, Cuba’s independence from Spain was also a result of another revolution in Cuba’s history that occurred around this same time period. Inevitably, the question arises. What were the origins of this second revolution and when did it occur? The answers of such questions are still unsolved to the researcher. On October 28th, 1492, Christopher Columbus (Appx.7) landed on the beautiful and mysterious island of Cuba. In honor of the daughter of King Ferdinand 5th (Appx.8) and Queen Isabella 1st (Appx.9) of Spain, he originally named the island Juana, which only later became known as Cuba due to its aboriginal name Cubanascnan. The large island was a colossal achievement for Columbus, whom thought at first it was the peninsula of Asia’s mainland. The vast amount of land compared to Hispaniola, Columbus’ first find, offered more possibilities of gold and farmland. However, it was inhabited by the Ciboney and Tainos, who presented a great difficulty for the explorer. It was not until 1511 that the island was set to be conquered by the Conquistador, Diego Velasquez (Appx.10), as he established the town of Baracoa. After three years of fighting a losing battle, the...
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