The Crucible Symbolism

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 85
  • Published : April 13, 2015
Open Document
Text Preview
Symbolism in The Crucible 
 
By Ben White 
                                     Hr. 4   
 
When Arthur Miller wrote his play “The Crucible” in 1953, the whole world was  entering into a war on Communists, the Cold War. During this time, Senator Joseph  McCarthy began a hunt for all Communists and many innocent people were punished.  This caused Arthur Miller write “The Crucible”, which portrays McCarthy’s injustice  through the story of the Salem Witch Trials. 

 
In Act III of the play, Giles Corey is trying to prove that Thomas Putnam is getting  the girls to accuse people so he can get their land. Amidst his accusations, Judge  Hathorne says he is trying to overthrow the court and soon he is arrested for contempt  of court. This is much like the McCarthy Era. In court, the accused (and innocent)  people would attempt to get out of questioning by pleading the 5th Amendment. In any  other case, they would be safe from contempt of court, but not here. Many innocent  (much like Giles Corey) were arrested for contempt of court.   

        In the final act of The Crucible, John Proctor decides he's going to confess, even  though it's ap lie, so he can be kept alive. When he confesses, Judge Danforth plans to 

hang his confession on the church door, which will excommunicate him from the church  and most likely Salem. This is much like the McCarthy trials. Many innocent people  were blacklisted just for being accused of communism, meaning that they lost their  reputation and a lot of times, their job. 

 
      Even though the McCarthy Era took place 260 years after the Salem Witch Trials,  The Crucible symbolizes the injustice of the time accurately.    
 
 ...
tracking img