The Complete Roman Army

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The Complete Roman Army
Introduction
The Roman Empire was arguably once one of the most powerful civilizations of our ancient world. Their reign lasted over 1000 years and covered nearly all of Europe, and parts of Africa and The Middle East. Adrian Goldsworthy, author of The Complete Roman Army, outlines many details pertinent to the ancient Roman Army. Today, scholars know a multitude of various facts about the Roman Army and why they were successful. Details such as the weapons used, types of formations that were practiced, and the characteristics of soldiers can be found in many different scholarly texts. These factors played a role in why Romans were successful warriors, but it doesn’t create the full picture as to why the Romans were such a powerful empire.

To understand why the Roman Empire and its Army was triumphant, we have to look at more of the imperial structure make-up. Roman’s didn’t perfect their warfare with the intentions of ruling all of the Mediterranean Sea. They abided by customs, which laid out the blueprints of their government, their social classes, and ultimately their military. In my report of the book: The Complete Roman Army, I will provide background on the history of Roman warfare, which creates a greater understanding of how the Roman Army was powerful due to other extenuating factors. Imperial Structure

Rome became a Republic form of government in 509 BCE, which allowed for growth economically and socially. Becoming a Republic created the influential existence of social classes that held separate powers of the Roman Republic. The custom of the two social classes created the formation of the Roman Army. The social classes consisted of plebeians and the patricians. The plebeians were made of landowners who fought in battles and were considered the middle class. The patricians were landowners that were born into a powerful family and made of many of the officers of the Roman Army. The Roman Republic represented...
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