The Claims

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 180
  • Published : February 17, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
January 9th, 2013
Books have been necessary for hundreds of years to the people of the world and still are. However, Ray Bradbury has the world of the novel Fahrenheit 451 think differently. Beatty, a fireman in the story, has an overall message to Montag, another fireman, which is that books create so many problems in the world and they do not do anything good. He explains this to Montag by stating three claims that all support his opinion. These claims are: the need for intelligence was cut down when technology had started to advance; books do not make everybody happy, they offend at least somebody which makes controversy throughout the globe; and books make people worry about things that they should not being worrying about. The first claim that Beatty had made was that knowledge or need for intelligence was cut down when technology had started to advance. He actually explains to Montag how people had lost interest in books. “’School is shortened discipline…nuts and bolts?’” (55-56). Which was the reason for what Beatty had explained to Montag earlier, that media was all cut down to the point of non-existence. For example the Beatty says, “’ Films and radios, magazines…you follow me?’” (54). He states that people had lost the need to put effort in using time to read about things. As a result, the society had lost the social norm of reading the books and decided that the books were not required for living. This idea relates to his second claim which is about how books had offended the society. Beatty’s second claim was that books do not make everybody happy; they offended at least somebody which made controversy throughout the globe. Since there are so many people in the world now, there is every single kind of minority. These minorities had disliked any book written and this had forced the authors to stop writing. Beatty says, “’the bigger your market, Montag, the less you handle controversy’” (57). Then later in his speech he articulates, “’you must...
tracking img