The Cask of Amontillado and Annabell Lee

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Sloan Davis
EH223
Rita Treutel
12-4-10
“The Cask of Amontillado” > “Annabell Lee”
Edgar Allan Poe is arguably the best romantic writer we have ever seen. I believe “Annabell Lee” and “The Cask of Amontillado” are perfect examples of Romantic Literature. “The Cask of Amontillado” and “Annabell Lee” both possess romantic subject matter, attitudescomma and techniques commabut “The Cask of Amontillado” has been called the “perfect short story” by a number of critics of the years, and I would undoubtedly agree.

“The Cask of Amontillado” begins with a strong characterization and mood continuing throughout the entire story. It stresses strong grotesque and gothic themes of terror and even encounters the universal fear of the unknown, making the story appealing to virtually everyone. Montresor makes a very interesting comment in the beginning of the story, “….and he did not perceive that my smile now was at the thought of immolation.” From the beginningcomma Montresor had grotesque thoughts of what he wanted Fortunto’s fate to be. Montresor committed premeditated murder. “Annabell Lee,” also has romantic subject matter but it is an interest in the past. Even though both works by Poe have romantic subject matter “The Cask of Amontillado” draws the reader in with every sentence packed full of romanticism that never even gives the reader a chance to put the story down.

In both works, Poe does a wonderful job of not focusing on details of location. He tells the reader just enough to get them hooked and leaves the reader hanging without details. “The Cask of Amontillado” automatically gives the reader a vague view of the situation. Poe begins with, “The thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as I best could, but when he ventured upon insult I vowed revenge.” What are the “thousand injuries” that Montresor is talking about that Poe never reveals throughout the story? In the second line, “You, who so well know the nature of my soul…,” we are once again given...
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