The Case Against Tipping

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The Case Against Tipping

Pros and Cons
1. Already paid a salary
2. Shouldn’t feel guilt to tip
3. More discretion equates to unpleasantness
4. Minimal amount of time and effort exerted
5. We are not programmed to give money away
6. Equivalent to a tax

Yes, but essay

Being part of the service industry can be a very non-rewarding job. Many people do not understand the preparation that takes place to provide good service. Usually before a restaurant opens the staff is there polishing and wrapping silverware, filling ice machines, setting tables, stocking sugar and salt and pepper shakers, etc. These tasks help to make restaurants run smoothly during regular business hours. Also, customers may not realize that the salary provided to those in the service industry is minimal and not enough to support a family. Tips are seen as a necessity to survive and are very much appreciated.

I do agree however, that too many services are requesting and expecting tips and that it’s becoming customary not only for individuals to expect tips but for patrons to expect to see a tip jar in almost every establishment. Deliberation

1. Already paid a salary- Tips supplement this salary, but the individual also selected this industry to work in. 2. Shouldn’t feel guilty to tip- While those in the service industry are not paid a lot in base salary, the tip should be dependent upon the quality of service provided. 3. More discretion equates to unpleasantness- When individuals are unsure how to handle a situation it can be unpleasant, but it also allows them the ability to determine on their own what is adequate. 4. Minimal amount of time and effort exerted - In some cases this is true, but in others a lot of behind the scenes work is done. 5. We are not programmed to give money away - While this is true, we are programmed to show expressions of gratitude. Therefore, if we think of tipping in this manner it may more easily accomplished without grief. 6. Equivalent to a tax- The same argument about not being programmed to give money away holds true here as well. To avoid thinking of tipping as an equivalent for tax, we need to think about it as an expression of gratitude.

I find the point that tipping is equivalent to a tax most compelling. More than almost anything I hate paying taxes, mostly because you are taxed when you make money, taxed when you spent money, and taxed on interest earned when you try to save money. Thinking of a tip as a tax really turns me off. Claim- Discretion when tipping is preferable.

The author claims that the more discretion you have in determining the amount of a tip, the more unpleasant tipping can be. I have experienced this in some cases, but only because when I am unsure of what is customary in a particular industry and I fear that I am not providing an adequate tip. For example, I am aware that when receiving a meal in a restaurant it is customary to tip between 15-20 percent. Further when receiving service in a restaurant, I typically determine the amount of the tip on the quality of service provided, i.e. higher for more attentive service. However, I am unsure of how this knowledge should transfer over when I pick up to-go service. When the server provides you the receipt it still has a place to fill in a tip amount. However, I am unable to determine the quality of service provided and that should this be based upon. Interestingly, while I agree with Lewis’s point, I also see this as an opening to not tip the customary amount of 15-20 percent. It’s almost liberating rather than unpleasant that there is no set amount. This same theory applies to many other industries where an established tip amount has not been set. These industries include hotel maids, bell boys, valet parking, and hair stylists.

Additionally, some restaurants automatically place a service charge on your bill if your party exceeds a certain amount...
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