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the burden of being a role model

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the burden of being a role model

  • Course: English
  • Professor: Cosand
  • School: Golden West College, CA
Page 1 of 8
Doheny 1
Amanda Doheny
Nov. 13.2013
English 100 @ 8:50 am
Essay #3
The Burden of Being a Role Model
Idols aren’t born, they are made. The people we look up to in our lives were not given that position, they had to earn it in from us. Sometimes we have to ask ourselves: Why do we put them on a pedestal? Most people tend to do this to family members, celebrities or even people we don’t know that work for branches of our local safety department or the military. But, the one place where people tend to hold a majority of their role models is with athletes. It’s no wonder why most people set their hearts on athletes because some of them exceed physical capabilities, give back to charities, set good examples off and on the arena and are just all around great people. Then when those athletes slip up and so something against what people look up to them for, they get frustrated and angry with them. Athletes like Tiger Woods, Michael Phelps, Lance Armstrong, Oscar Pistorius to name a few. In some people’s eyes these were roles that they inspired to be, but because they tainted their own good reputation people have let them fall from the pedestal from which they once stood. One aspect that hardly anyone looks at is the fact that when athletes make “One bad decision, and they are blamed for letting us down”(Gary, 3). So the question remains: Are athletes responsible for setting a good example or should they not put be put given the ultimate responsible to be to end-all-be-all of role models? Doheny 2

Ever since the dawn of spots has arrived into humanity, people have treated some of its players with utter admiration. The farthest we can go back is Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, Babe Ruth or Sugar Ray Robinson. Back then people portrayed all athletes as heroic idols who did wonders on and off the arena. It was hard for most people to look at these athletes in another way because “…it was easy to confuse sports stardom, which someone like DiMaggio earned,...
Doheny 1
Amanda Doheny
Nov. 13.2013
English 100 @ 8:50 am
Essay #3
The Burden of Being a Role Model
Idols aren’t born, they are made. The people we look up to in our lives were not given
that position, they had to earn it in from us. Sometimes we have to ask ourselves: Why do we put
them on a pedestal? Most people tend to do this to family members, celebrities or even people
we don’t know that work for branches of our local safety department or the military. But, the one
place where people tend to hold a majority of their role models is with athletes. It’s no wonder
why most people set their hearts on athletes because some of them exceed physical capabilities,
give back to charities, set good examples off and on the arena and are just all around great
people. Then when those athletes slip up and so something against what people look up to them
for, they get frustrated and angry with them. Athletes like Tiger Woods, Michael Phelps, Lance
Armstrong, Oscar Pistorius to name a few. In some people’s eyes these were roles that they
inspired to be, but because they tainted their own good reputation people have let them fall from
the pedestal from which they once stood. One aspect that hardly anyone looks at is the fact that
when athletes make “One bad decision, and they are blamed for letting us down”(Gary, 3). So
the question remains: Are athletes responsible for setting a good example or should they not put
be put given the ultimate responsible to be to end-all-be-all of role models?