The Brave, the Bold, and Mary Mcleod Bethune

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  • Topic: African American, Mary McLeod Bethune, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
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  • Published : November 1, 2012
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The Brave, the Bold, and Mary McLeod Bethune
Introduction
There are many famous women throughout history from all over the world. One in particular is Mary McLeod Bethune. Some may ask who she is, and what she did, because rarely do you hear her name from day to day. Mary McLeod Bethune was an inspirational African-American woman of the 20th century. She proved that even African-Americans (especially females) can make outstanding achievements.

Backround Information
Mary McLeod Bethune was born on July 10th in 1875, to Samuel and Patsy McLeod, in Mayesville, South Carolina. She was the 15th child out of her parents’ 17, and was the first one born a free slave. Mary was also the first child within her family to be able to attend school. She first attended Presbyterian Mission School, in Mayesville, South Carolina from 1882 to 1886. About a year later in 1887, she went to Scotia Seminary, and moved on to attend Moody Bible Institute from 1894 to 1895. Three years later, in 1898, Mary McLeod married Albertus Bethune. Within a year, Mary became pregnant and gave birth to her son Albertus McLeod Bethune, in 1899. As the years went on, Mary’s husband (who died in 1919) decided to leave her. It is said that he felt as though Mary was paying to mush attention to her work, and not enough attention to him. Even though at that point Mary was a single mother, she still managed to be a full time mother as well as an educator.

Major Accomplishments
In the 1900’s, Mary founded many organizations, helped with the civil rights movement, and became a presidential advisor. In 1935, Mary became a special advisor on minority affairs to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. She also campaigned democratic and humanitarian causes, and made a vital contribution to the civil rights movement. She went on to become the president of the Florida Federation of Colored Women in 1917, founded the Southeastern Federation of Colored Women in 1920, and became the president of the National...
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