The Black Power Movement

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The Black Power Movement

During and after the days of Jim Crow, blacks in the United States were economically and

socially oppressed. Blacks still faced lower wages than whites, segregation of public amenities

and racial discrimination. At this time many groups were created to challenge these injusticces.

The Black Power Movement and the Civil Rights movement were similar because they both

fought for equal rights and equal treatment for African Americans. However, they sought to

achieve different goals and implemented different forms of action to achieve change. The Civil

Rights Movement fought for desegregation and believed in non-violence, while the Black Power

Movement rejected integration for racial seperation (Jefferies, 2006). In this essay, I am going to

further discuss the tactics used by the Black Power Movement to gain change, and the

accomplishements they achieved.

Emerging after the civil rights movement of the 1950's, the Black Power Movement

was arguably one of the most influential and controversial movements of the 20th century. “Black

Power” as a political idea originated in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committe (SNCC)

in the mid 1960's (Jeffereies, 2006). At this time a leader emerged by the name of Stokley

Carmichael. Upon gaining leadership, Carmichael ejected white members and believed that the

only way to bring about change for blacks was to have an all black union.Stokleley Carmichael

believed that Black Power would instill a fear in whites and love in blacks ( Carmichael, 1967).In

1966, Huey Newton and Bobby Seale formed the Black Panther Party for Self Defense (BPP) in

Oakland California. By the late 1960's, the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee

(SNCC) and the Black Panther Party for Self Defense began to gain momentum.

Martin Luther King Jr imitated Ghandi and his use of non-violebnce...
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