The Bible Among Myths

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GUIDELINES FOR THE PRACTICAL BOOK REVIEW

By

La Tasha C. Williams
Student ID: 25445478

Presented to Dr. Kristi Miller

In partial fulfillment of the requirements of

Introduction of Old Testament

OBST 590

Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary
Lynchburg, VA
April 7, 2013


The Bible Among The Myths
I believe that Worldview is seriously influenced by culture, knowledge, politics, religion and upbringing. Therefore, it is not uncommon to meet people who view the Bible as mythical literature. Hence there have been occasions when I have found myself in an intense debate about whether or not information in the Bible is real. As a result, there have been occasions when my opponents have presented strong arguments that have compelled me to go home and do further research. Hence, this book is a valuable resource to my library as it is filled with clear concise information that refutes the theory that the bible is a myth. It can also be used as a reference to support research on Ancient Eastern culture as well as religious practices of antiquity. Chapter 1- The Bible in its World

This chapter gives an overview of various worldviews of the Bible. It starts out be summarizing the two conflicting rationales held by Greek philosophers which believed that there is a universe and poly-verse. Eventually, the views held by the ancient Greek philosophers concluded with the expiration of the philosopher’s and the Greek culture was influenced by the idea of a world of myths. The chapter later discusses the journey of various cultural views held by the Hebrews. Though the Hebrew culture initially believed in a monotheistic view of God, the military and political influence of the Assyrians and Babylonians caused some of the Israelites to struggle with the consistency of their faith. However, the various prophets who proclaimed the word of the Lord were valuable contributors to the continuance of the Hebrew faith. The next topic discussed in chapter one is the “Combining Greek and Hebrew Thought” (25). Here Oswalt discusses the origin of the Christianity and the impact of the Greek and Hebrew views on Greco-Roman Empire which existed during the dispersion of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Thus, “the Greeks were able to show the Hebrews that in this real world there is a linkage of Cause and effect that the Hebrews tended to overlook in their emphasis on the First Cause”(26). This notion progressed idea that logic and science had a coherent reality. Hence, the chapter concludes with the notion that science and logic are implausible without the undergirding of Biblical Principles. If one chooses to eradicate Biblical Principles, then he is in danger of “playing out the Bacchae again”(27) which will end in “the pursuit of survival, dominance, comfort and pleasure”(27). As a result, Oswalt goes on to discuss why the Bible is not a myth in chapter two.

Chapter Two- The Bible and Myth: A Problem of Definition
In chapter two, Oswalt deals with the problem of defining a myth. Henceforth he deals with the issue that in order to begin to clearly determine what a myth is we should at least determine what a myth is not. He then informs the reader of various definitions associated with the concept of a myth. These definitions are separated into two groups; Historical-Philosophical and phenomenological (34). Under the etymological definitions, he classifies the following definitions as such: Myths were legends of false gods (33), a story of the gods in which results of natural causes are accounted for supernaturally, or a myth is a story involving a pre-scientific world view (34). Oswalt then begins to discuss the problems with these definitions of myths from the etymological perspective as an issue because “the burden of proof continues to rest on those who say it is incorrect” and “they are frequently too...
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