The Benefits of Watching Food Shows

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  • Topic: Food, Iron Chef, Iron Chef America
  • Pages : 9 (2789 words )
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  • Published : February 11, 2013
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THE BENEFITS OF WATCHING FOOD SHOWS PERCEIVED
BY THE SELECTED HRM STUDENTS OF CENTRO
ESCOLAR UNIVERSITY MAKATI

By
Almocera, Jashi Rose O.
Balamban, Celine Nicolae C.
Facinabao, Jeff Kurt S.
Kilap - KIlap, Jerico H.
and
Malihan, Maybelle Allen B.

CHAPTER 1
The Problem and Its Setting

Introduction
No doubt that reached a point where eating food is no longer enough – we must now be entertain by it. And boy, are we ever. In the past 10 years, more than ever before, food-related programming loomed Large (on cable, in particular) and during the same decade that bid goodbye to Julia Child-a pioneer of so many things, including food TV-we welcomed the shiny young faces of Rachael Ray, Giada De Laurentiis, Bobby Flay and more into our homes. But in much the same way that the past 10 years have ushered in a Golden Age of Television, so too has it seen a shift in the quality of food TV. There’s still a place for the friendly host walking us through all manner of chopping and poaching on camera in a faux-homey studio kitchen, but this decade’s best food programming has plied our species’ basic need for sustenance with our culture’s love of competition and thirst for voyeurism into shows that are suspenseful, hilarious, challenging, maddening, and stomach-rumble-including-often all at once.

Motivation to high level of performance is satisfaction with the job. Satisfaction is not the same as motivation; viewer’s satisfaction is more attitudes, an internal state. So the researches decided to have a study about the benefits of the food shows as perceived by the selected HRM students. Food. It is not just for dinner anymore. There is now food politics, food issues, food crisis, Food Inc., and the Food Network. One can talk about food, read about food, eat food and watch food being cooked, all within the span of a single day. Information on food and restaurants – in some form or another – permeates the airwaves, the Internet and many major print publications, be it books or magazines or newspapers. Food sells. But, other than the fact that we all have to eat, why has food become so popular in our collective conversations? Former New York Times restaurant critic Frank Bruni says, “food is an aspect of culture that, because everyone necessarily participates in it to some degree, is more egalitarian than, say, ballet, or opera, or even theater. It's easier and less intimidating to join the fray and weigh in with an opinion” (Haskell, 2010). Everyone, it seems, has something to say about food.

Terms like, “braise, bake, broil and baste,” which were once only heard in the kitchen, are now a normal part of water cooler/happy-hour/book club discussions. Cooking is no longer seen as domestic drudgery; it is now a form of entertainment and a way to connect. Food brings people together and, at the most basic level, it is a simple and friendly conversation starter. Whether it is a discussion about what is currently on your plate or where you plan to eat next week, food is common ground. Moreover, with the selection of food programming boiling over on television, it is easier than ever to find an appetizing food program. While the Food Network still dominates the cooking show medium, Bravo, the Travel Channel, the Public Broadcasting. Station (PBS), The Learning Channel (TLC), the network television stations, and the recently launched Cooking Channel (sister station to the Food Network) all fight for viewership. But it is not just images of delectable dinners that entice us to sit in front of the television instead of at our kitchen tables; many viewers tune in because they want to see what their favorite celebrity chef is cooking up for dinner.

Chef extraordinaire Emeril Lagasse, along with other celebrity chefs such as Rachel Ray, Bobby Flay, Giada De Laurentis and Paula Deen, have made a once maternal obligation an entertaining pastime for millions of Americans. Yet, even as more and more people equip...
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