The Artic

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Question 1:
a.
i. Visit each of the three different museum rooms( ‘photos, maps and data’, ‘objects’ and ‘pictures’) and choose 5 items that could be used to explore the theme ‘Ways of life in the Artic’. You must select at least one item from each room. List the 5 items that you have chosen

The 5 items that I have chosen from the ‘ museum cabinet’ are as follow : * A metal Ulu( knife)
* A modern map of the Artic
* A painting of Cape Liddon, Devon Island
* A wooden doll of a hunting man
* A piece of driftwood

ii. Explain the reasons for choosing each of these 5 items. You will need to explain which aspects of ‘Ways of life in the Artic’ your exhibition will illustrate and how each item illustrates these, as well as your other reasons for the selection of these items over others.

The first item I have choosen for my exhibition is the Ulu knife as this type of knife illustrate an important aspect of ‘Ways of life in the Artic’ by representing the Inuit peoples and their ancestors. This type of knives are unique to the Artic regions. It also indicates that the Artic has been habitated for thousands of years and show us how the Inuit people used the resources available to them within their environment to survive in such harsh conditions. These tools are an integral part of the Inuit tradition and were originally made out of stone or parts of animals they hunted and were designed purposely for cutting meat, ice and snow and mainly used by women as Ulu means ‘Women’s knife’.

The second item I decided to choose for my exhibition is a modern map of the Artic which illustrate where the Artic regions are located and what the Artic consists of which are ocean surrounded by continental land masses and islands. The Artic ocean is covered by ice all year round, and snow and ice are present on land for most of the year. This map of the Artic also defines the Artic regions and their climate, as the area north of the treeline (the northern limit of tree growth, ) the locations in high latitudes where the average daily summer temperature does not rise above 10 degrees Celsius Isotherm and the Artic circle. The third item, which illustrates the Artic is a painting of Cape Liddon, Devon Island. This painting captivates your imagination and will confirm what most people think the Artic might look like even if they never been. The Artic regions are of incredible beauty and defined by the appearances of the landscape through the spectacular colour in the sea, sky, snow and the ice. The fourth item from my exhibition is the wooden doll of a hunting man, which represent the Inuit culture and their traditions. The Inuit are the people who originally lived in the Artic. Perharps the best known Inuit way of life was one found in the Canadian Artic. It involved the people spending winters in temporary snowhouses communities out on the sea while hunting seals and whales as well as other species. They used all parts of the animals hunted for food, to make tools, build shelter and made clothing which were both warm and ideall suited for the climate and the activities of the people.Over time they developed a distinctive and complex adaptation to this region and these resources.

The fifth and final item, I choose as an aspect to illustrate ‘Ways of life in the Artic’ is a piece of driftwood. I found this very interesting as it would not automatically be thought of as an item found in the Artic. Mainly because the Artic is defined as the area North of the tree line, which indicates that trees due to environmental conditions can not grow. This piece of driftwood dates back from thousand of years and was washed off the shore of a Svalbard beach. I selected these 5 items instead of others being displayed in the Scott Polar Research Institute, as I felt they would appeal to different ages and would captivate the audience through learning about them by reading the information provided, listening to the...
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