The Application of Management

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Final Paper: Researching Workgroup Productivity within Restaurants Mae Ella
MGT: 415
Professor Dennis Lauvier
4/16/2012

Researching Workgroup Productivity within Restaurants
After years of restaurant management experience and analysis, I can tell you that restaurants rely heavily upon a group of individuals which effectually work together to accomplish the organizational objectives; therefore, structured workgroup dynamics are necessary for optimal group productivity and cohesiveness. Restaurant workgroups need leadership which imposes the proper utilization of apposite tools and strategy, in collaboration with capable and effective conflict resolution. It is important that group leaders remove any obstacles which may obstruct workgroup productivity and/or hinder the group's performance and overall success. Restaurant workgroups face an abundant array of issues: role and intergroup conflict, communication problems, and at times the cohesiveness may decline among its diverse members- all of which can hinder group productivity. When there is influential direction from proficient leadership, correlated with solid workgroup dynamics, the restaurant workgroup is better equipped to overcome any barriers that may hinder its cohesiveness, and overall, can function more productively. Group Behavior in Organizations, by Susan Losh (2011), explains that “Group dynamics refers to the study of the structure, properties, and processes that exist in collectivities in which members interact to achieve common and interdependent goals.” In researching a restaurant, the fundamental aspect you must first consider, is the workgroup dynamics within. Restaurants are almost always occupied as a group of individuals working together within it, and it depends upon this foundational group support system to carry out the organizational objectives successfully. Observing the workgroup dynamics employed within the restaurant, examines what features most effectively warrant optimal productivity in carrying out these organizational tasks. In researching the productivity of a restaurant workgroup, it is important to analyze what concerns the workgroup faces, as well as how they handle and overcome these issues, and further prevent such problems from hindering their productively. It is important that the workgroup is aligned with the proper tools, and that they have these resources readily available to utilize, should obstacles arise. One of the most prevalent trepidations of a restaurant’s workgroup, is the occurrence of intergroup and role conflict which may impede the productivity of its members if not addressed and resolved properly. According to Gary Krebs (2011), author of Communication in Organizations, “Group roles are patterns of communication that group members develop over time with other members. These communication patterns serve different functions for groups and become expectations for group member behavior.” Role conflict within the workgroup usually deals with problems concerning one’s role within the group, or animosity in perception towards other roles. Barbara Bowes (2012), author of Re: Structure, Make sure Organizational Roles are Clear, stresses that, “If an employee's role is not clear, then individuals are left to make assumptions about their responsibilities… Overall, interpersonal conflicts will arise, important work tasks can be neglected and conflicts will occur over role, responsibility and authority.” “Conflict is an unavoidable part of interpersonal relations and organizational life because each relational partner has different goals, ideas, and strategies for addressing organizational issues” (Krebs 2011). Conflict will naturally arise among a group of diverse individuals interacting, so rather than letting it negatively impact the workgroup, instead, encourage any conflict to remain healthy- you can do this by promoting that conflict remains positive and produces beneficial results . “There are in...
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