The Anatomist: a True Story of Gray's Anatomy

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  • Topic: Anatomy, History of anatomy, Henry Gray
  • Pages : 2 (623 words )
  • Download(s) : 116
  • Published : December 16, 2012
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The Anatomist: A True Story of Gray's Anatomy
When I started reading “The Anatomist: A True Story of Gray's Anatomy” I didn't find it interesting, I don't know if it was because it was a book about another book or because I thought it was going to be like Gray's Anatomy the show but it wasn't. However, the first thing I noticed about this book was the illustrations, they were magnificent. The bibliography was the other thing I noticed, I always knew that you needed sources to make a good book, but Bill Hayes had eight pages of sources! This made it where I could trust that the things I read within this book were correct. The facts in this book are true. Hayes set out to write a biography of Henry Gray, of “Gray's Anatomy", he discovered close to nothing of records. But dauntless he just shifted his focus a bit. Instead of writing about Gray, he wrote about his search for Gray, and his discovery of another fascinating man whose name had fallen by the wayside: Henry Carter, the illustrator of Gray's book.It turns out that Carter was a constant diarist and letter writer. It is through his eyes that Hayes came to know what little could be learned about his colleague Henry Gray. Hayes throws himself not only into these documents, but into the cadavers of an anatomy lab as he strives to understand, as fully as he can, the men who produced a remarkable book. It is amazing that he did everything he could to get the information he needed for this book. In trying to understand what Henry Gray did, Hayes put himself through Anatomical Dissection classes, getting a "feel " for the raw material which Gray and Carter transferred to paper. He definitely shifts back and forth between the two narratives. At some point this made it hard for me to understand who he was talking about, but then it got easier. Through out the book Hayes often used analogies such as: “The building was set well back from the street, and, just as the ear canal leads to the eardrum, one passed through a...
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