Read full document

Thai Literature

Page 1 of 2
Thai literature
From edit box|
Thai literature was traditionally heavily influenced by Indian culture. Thailand's national epic is a version of the Ramayana called the Ramakien. A number of versions of the epic were lost in the destruction of Ayutthaya in 1767. Three versions currently exist: one of these was prepared under the supervision (and partly written by) King Rama I. His son, Rama II, rewrote some parts for khon drama. The main differences from the original are an extended role for the monkey god Hanuman and the addition of a happy ending. The most important poet in Thai literature was Sunthorn Phu, who is best known for his romantic adventure story Phra Aphai Mani and nine travel pieces called Nirats. Kings Rama V and Rama VI were also writers, mainly of non-fiction works as part of their programme to combine Western knowledge with traditional Thai culture. 20th century Thai writers have tended to produce light fiction rather than literature, but the Isan region has produced two notably sociocritical writers in Khamsing Srinawk and Pira Sudham. Thailand has had a wealth of expatriate writers in the 20th century as well. The Bangkok Writers Group is currently publishing fiction by Indian author G.Y. Gopinath, the fabulist A.D. Thompson, as well as non-fiction by Gary Dale Cearley

Author;Kaiya Johanna Walsh, Thailand
Poem
RainRain falls, heavy, continuously
Ominous black clouds hang above me
Feeling empty, soulless
In the dark depths of the well
Looking up at the
Foreboding weight of the mass above me
Which gives me no sense
Of understanding

The rain continues to fall
As I sit below,
Alone

My mind
In a fog
My thoughts and movements
Slow and sluggish
There is nobody to give me support or comfort
No one to help keep me sane

I shed tears
Of pain and misery
My tears spill over my cheeks
Run down me and I feel them slowly…
Slowly making their way
To where they can be free

The heavy rain keeps making its way down...