Texting in Teenager Life

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Thanh Nguyen
Texting in Teenagers Lives

As technology has grown, the ways to get in touch with someone instantly have as well. With the advent of cell phone and the Internet, we’ve become accustomed to being able to find out what someone is doing, right now, at all hours. Especially, for America's teens, cell phones have become a vital social tool and texting the preferred mode of communication. Texting provides an opportunity for a quick, concise, effective means of communication. However, texting still have the harmful effects and definite influences to their lives, health and development. Today, in business cell phone market, as the manufactures compete vigorously on forms, designs and especially on price, the number of teenagers who using cell phone is increasing day by day and causing the phenomenon “. In the article “Teen Texting Soars; Will Social Skills Suffer?” of Jennifer Ludden, according to a new poll by the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project, 75% of teens between the ages of 12 and 17 now have cell phones, up from 45% in 2004. And the number of them who say the text-message daily has shot up to 54 percent from 38% in just past 18 months. There's now an expectation that teens will contact each other via text, and they expect a kind of constant, frequent response. In the article: “Texting May Be Taking a Toll” of Katie Hafner, according to the Nielsen Company, teenagers sent or received an average of 2,272 text messages a month in the fourth quarter of 2008, almost 80 messages a day, more than double the year before. Dr. Martin Joffe, a pediatrician in Greenbrae, Calif., recently surveyed students at two local high schools and said he found that many were routinely sending hundreds of texts every day. Meanwhile, in the article “It’s Official: Teens prefer Texting to Talking”, based on the survey fielded to 500 American teens through the use of social networks, teens text for some main reasons such as making plants with friends (20%), gossip (10%), flirting (7%), checking with parents (3%), latest news (3%), sports (2%), etc. This survey also shows that 28% teens text at home, 18% while on computer, 17% while riding in a car, 14% in class, 11% during a meal, 10% during a movie and 2% while driving. Texting help teens communicate and connect with the world around them easily.They can share their feelings, moments and plants to their friends and people they know anytime and anywhere. They can also have fun and release stress through the funny story or text that people share with them. There's now an expectation that teens will contact each other via text, and they expect a kind of constant, frequent response (Ludden). They do it late at night when their parents are asleep. They do it in restaurants and while crossing busy streets. They do it in the classroom with their hands behind their back. They do it so much their thumbs hurt (Hafner). Texting has become an established part of teens’ lives. However, while teens feel comfortable and familiar with texting, the parents, psychologists and educators feel worried about the negative impacts of texting on health, lives and the development of teenagers. It is leading to anxiety, distraction in school, falling grades, repetitive stress injury and sleep deprivation (Hafner). According to the article “Too much texting? The New York Times assesses the impact of texting messaging on health”, text messages allow teenagers to communicate in places where cell phones are not allowed, primarily school. It’s fairly easy to hide a cell phone to hide and text, and texting teenagers are not focusing on the lesson at hand. In the article of Jennifer Ludden, the Pew report finds that most schools ban texting in class, but allow it in the halls or at lunch. At school where cell phones are forbidden, 58% of students with mobile phones say they’ve sent a text message during class. For example, Annie Wagner, 15, a ninth-grade honor student in Bethesda, Md.,...
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