Texting and Driving

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I. Technology and Driving (History of problem)
A. Texting and Driving
1. Nearly nine in 10 teenage drivers have engaged in distracted-driving behaviors such as texting or talking on a cellphone although most of them know that their actions increase their risk of crashing, a new survey finds 2. Text messaging creates a crash risk 23 times worse than driving while not distracted B. Distracted Driving

3. The top three behaviors that respondents had participated in: adjusting a radio/CD/MP3 player (73%), eating (61%) and talking on a cellphone (60%); 28% had sent a text message 4. Sending or receiving a text takes a driver's eyes from the road for an average of 4.6 seconds, the equivalent-at 55 mph-of driving the length of an entire football field, blind II. Electronics in the Car (Causes of problem)

C. Cell Phones
5. 28% had sent a text message
6. In the month of June 2011, more than 196 billion text messages were sent or received in the US, up nearly 50% from June 2009. (CTIA)

D. Radio’s
7. adjusting a radio/CD/MP3 player (73%)
8. Example / explanation
III. Accidents (The Effects and implications)
E. Injuries
9. 18% of injury crashes in 2010 were reported as distraction-affected crashes 10.
F. Death
11. Almost 6,000 highway deaths each year involve distracted driving, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says 12. 11% of all drivers under the age of 20 involved in fatal crashes were reported as distracted at the time of the crash. This age group has the largest proportion of drivers who were distracted IV. Limiting electronic accessibility (Solutions)

G. Mobile App
13. Blocks phone from sending and receiving text messages H. Police
This changed in 2007 when Senate Bill No. 1099 made driving while using a hand-held cell phone a primary offense, thereby allowing an officer to stop a vehicle without any additional reason if the officer believes the driver is using a hand-held cell phone. Distracted Destruction

Distracted driving in the United States is a problem well beyond anything anyone could ever think. When people read or hear about someone dying while driving it is usually from a car crash or someone hitting someone else; but many people would be surprised to see the amount of men and women killed every year from distracted driving accidents. Nearly 6,000 distracted driving deaths occur a year (Copeland). With so many deaths in the U.S. coming from distracted driving problems the government should start looking more into the history of the problem, causes and effects, and solutions that can be taken to subtract the number of distracted driving accidents a year.

Today’s technology causes many problems for drivers at the wheel, but these problems have been occurring sense cars have been in existence. The history of the nation’s distracted driving problem was occurring because of driver’s lack of focus. Even with knowing the risk 9 out of 10 teenage drivers still text and talk on the phone while driving (Copeland). This lack of focus by teenage and even older drivers is increasing casualties on the road every year. A major factor that drivers look past is the increase in risk that drivers take as they text and drive because it puts them at a 23 percent higher risk of having an accident. Texting and driving along with talking on the cell phone are not the only things that make a driver distracted. Though there are many other distractions any driver that takes the risk of driving distracted puts themselves and others at a life threating risk. The top three distracted driving behaviors are: radio/CD/MP3 73%, eating 61%, cellphone talking 60%, and text messaging 28%. All of these distractions go toward the risk of having an accident when driving (Copeland). When a driver messes with the radio to find...
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