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Natural Calamities
A natural calamity is a major adverse event resulting from natural processes of, or effecting, the Earth; examples include floods, severe weather, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and other geologic processes. A natural calamity can cause loss of life or property damage, and typically leaves some economic damage in its wake, the severity of which depends on the affected population's resilience, or ability to recover. A natural calamity are the side effects or the after effects of natural issues or hazards like flood, volcanic erosion, land slide or earthquake which will lead to the human, monetary and environmental losses. The eventual loss generally depends on the probability of the population which is affected by the natural calamities. The belief is focused in the forming of natural calamity, which happens when the disasters meet the probability of the people affected by these disasters or natural calamities. Hence, the natural calamity will not eventually lead to a natural hazard in the areas where there is no vulnerability or probability like, for example, an earthquake with a strong wave range will not affect the area which is less populated or uninhabited locations. The word natural has eventually become controversial because of the fact that these calamities or events may generally not so dangerous or hazardous until and unless there is any human being involved or effected by it. A strong and simple example which will clearly define and differentiate between a natural hazard or danger and a natural disaster is that in 1906 when there was a strong wave range earthquake in San Francisco. Natural calamities would be the phenomenon which can’t always be prevented, but we can get precautions. Natural Calamities such as: earthquakes, Tsunamis, floods, tornados, and volcanic erosions, which cause disorder within our everyday lives. At the moment, with the support in Science and expertise, we will be capable to offset these natural calamities furthermore to prevent these disasters as well as trim down its impact on people. On the other hand, it is feasible to trim down the effects of Natural Calamities and disaster by adopting appropriate disaster improvement strategies. Natural calamities improvement primarily attend to the following, which includes the process of reducing the probable risks by making “disaster before time caution strategies”. Natural calamities leaves a series of troubles which are faced by human beings like death, destruction of places and people, loss of animal and plant life as well, disturbed communication and transportation etc. All these factors makes life miserable and so time is very much required for those people who are affected by the natural calamities and disaster.

Avalanches

Avalanches and landslides are very similar because both types of disasters can be very destructive. Landslides are mostly caused by movement in the ground and the force of gravity pulling down on all earthly objects. Landslides can also be caused by heavy rain, earthquakes, and even some man-made causes such as road work. Landslides usually consist of falling rocks and sliding earth in addition to failure in the Earth’s surface. Avalanches and landslides often occur in conjunction with other natural disasters such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and other faults in the earth. Effects of landslides include collapsing buildings, collapsing roads, and even death.

Avalanches are like landslides in many ways. Both can be caused by failures in the earth’s surface. While landslides are mostly rocks and other sloped structures, avalanches consist of falling and sliding snow. Avalanches are measured on the logarithmic scale, which usually consists of five categories. The avalanche’s size and amount of destruction can be rated on the logarithmic scale. There are two main types of avalanches: a surface avalanche and a full-depth avalanche. A full depth avalanche is more severe than a surface...
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