Tesla Turbine

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  • Topic: Force, Tesla turbine, Boundary layer
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  • Published : April 24, 2013
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11/19/2012
MARE 451 Senior Design Capstone Project 1 Fall 2012 |
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Brian Tiefenthaler
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Brian Tiefenthaler
| MLP’s MARE 451 Sr. Design Tesla Turbine|

| MLP’s MARE 451 Sr. Design Tesla Turbine|

Table of Contents

Duties and responsibilitiesPage 3
Discussion of Tesla TurbinePage 4
Brian’s Responsibilities Page 7
Drag Force equationsPage 7
Torque equationsPage 9
Horsepower equationsPage 10
Pump specificationsPage 11
Pump equationsPage 12
Bearing selectionsPage 15
Pro E ModelingPage 17
Tesla Turbine ResultsPage 25
End Remarks and ConclusionPage 28
Works CitedPage 29
Personal NotesAppendix A
Table of Contents
Caleb Fonner’s Personal NotesAppendix B
Norman Hilliard’s Personal NotesAppendix C
Jake Schirber’sAppendix D

MLP Tesla Turbine group member’s duties
Team MLP (Tesla turbine)
Caleb Fonner
* Head of stress analysis
* Head of materials analysis
Norman Hilliard
* Head of fluid system analysis
* Helped with stress analysis
Jake Schirber
* Power
* Helped with stress analysis
Brian Tiefenthaler
* Pro E/CAD designer
* Helped with fluid analysis
* Helped with stress analysis
*

Project Discussion
The Tesla turbine for MARE 451 Senior Design Capstone Project 1 has been broken up into sections for analysis and design by individual members of the group. My responsibilities included; * Stresses on the shaft within the turbine

* Help with fluid dynamics through the piping system leading up to the turbine * All Pro E drawings
* Full analysis of the system as a whole.
A Tesla turbine is essentially a bladeless centripetal flow turbine. Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) designed and patented this device in 1913. Even though our design uses 15 “blades” it is considered a bladeless turbine because it utilizes the boundary layer effect. Boundary layer is defined for this project as the thin layer of water closest to the wall of the turbine. As the working fluid enters the turbine chamber it is applied to the edge of the disks, the fluid drags on the disks by means of viscosity and adhesion of the surface layer of the fluid. The fluid adds energy to the disks and that energy turns into rotational force which will turn the disks, turning the turbine shaft. Tesla turbines are rated for efficiencies of above 60% up to 95%, the purpose of this design is to create a turbine that uses saltwater as its working fluid coming the sea while the ship is underway. Using the “waste” seawater we will be able to convert it to rotational energy to drive any number or smaller pumps replacing the motor and reducing operating costs. Our turbine is comprised of 20 6” diameter 0.125” thick disks spaced 0.0625” apart from each other. The casing has a rough diameter of 6.75” leaving 0.75” clearance between the wall and the edge of the disks. The working fluid enters the turbine chamber near the top and exits through the bottom of the turbine. Due to the nature of our chosen working fluid, seawater heavy calculations were needed in fluid dynamics. Calculations were needed from the inlet at the sea to the sea strainer, through the piping system, across a butterfly valve to throttle the inlet velocity of the turbine down to the desired velocity. The whole of the turbine needed to be analyzed to determine the force on the individual disks due to the fluid, the pressure drop across the disks, and the forces exerted on the shaft due to the fluid. The forced produced on the disks Fd was then taken and torque per disk was discovered, and then total torque applied to the shaft was calculated. The forces applied to the shaft needed to be determined in order to select the proper bearing for this system. The bearing needed to be able to handle the load applied by the shaft within a certain...
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