Terrorism After 9/11

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Terrorism After 9/11

By | March 2007
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There is no question that terrorism, especially transnational terrorism, has increased dramatically since the fall of the USSR. Some say that this is the case because the world lost a balancing power which could keep the Americans in check. The International System has gone from being bipolar to unipolar, with the U.S. as the world's only remaining hegemon. But I will focus on more recent events relating to transnational terrorism and how it has been affected since the Iraq invasion in 2003. This paper will have a liberal point of view to tackle the issue. My argument or thesis will be that, indeed, transnational terrorism has increased and become more sophisticated in some cases since the Iraq war started over three and a half years ago. During the course of the paper I'll make references to specific terrorist attacks and explain why, in my opinion, the American decision to invade Iraq has led to increased cases of transnational terrorist acts.

Since I have liberal ideas myself, that is the theoretical approach I'll be using. In the eyes of most liberals, the invasion of the sovereign nation of Iraq was uncalled for, illegitimate, and against international law and general norms. There was absolutely no proof relating Iraq to transnational terrorism. Quite the opposite, Iraq and its ex-leader had a long history of not wanting any involvement with any terrorist organizations, unlike a couple of other countries in that same region which, sometimes, openly support them. This makes one think that even if Iraq did have weapons of mass destruction, which was the first American reason to go to war, Saddam most likely wouldn't have shared them with any terrorist groups. Of course, the reason of weapons of mass destruction as an

excuse for war have since then been morphed into the recently-termed reasons of democracy and liberty, whichever fits the U.S. agenda best.
Liberalism sees this U.S. policy of aggression as unnecessary and dependent on rash decisions. In...