Terresterial Ecology

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Terrestrial Ecology
Teamates:
Olivia Nohrenhold
Philippe Mukubi
Daniel Ishmael

Site: RRCC Old Frisbee Golf Course
The BIO112, Sec 001 class did an investigative ecological survey in the field, just north of the Main Lakewood Campus. This report specifically focuses on circular plot #4. Team-Two consisted of Lance Harris, Daniel Ishmael, Olivia Nohrenhold, and Philippe Mukubi. Each member had various disciplines of study. Each topic has its corresponding researcher, next to the each heading.

Figure 1 – Sector-4, Team-2 Area of Study

Brief History:
In the past the area under review was to be used as a RRCC Faculty Parking Lot. The land was cleared, and partially leveled, before a more appropriate site was selected for the parking. Unfortunately, the land was already destroyed beyond recognition. All of the native species had been bull-dozed to the ground. The previously beautiful grassland was now a dirt wasteland. At least the ecology of the area was allowed to recover for many years. More recently there was an idea for a Frisbee golf course. Once again, this same site was left to the destruction of humans. Frisbee Golf seemed to be a sport with minimal impact on the environment. In fact, the foot traffic, and partying of delinquent teenagers did not leave the area with expected results. The Frisbee golf course was scrapped, and finally the land was allowed to rest in peace. The purpose of lab, is to study the recovery of this land to its natural state. Each semester, students record data showing the progress of producers, consumers, decomposers, and abiotic features in the area. As of right now, the land seems to be on a healthy track of recovery. Hopefully, there will not be any other human impacts on this area.

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Figure 2 - General Area of Study

2|Page

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1

4

2

5

3
6

Each plot area has a radius of 4m

Figure 3 - Specific area of study: Plot 4 (Highlighted in blue)

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1

5

3

4
Vegetation
Plot

Figure 4 - Locations of 1m x 1m Vegetation plots with respective Sections (1-5)

Overall Vegetation (Olivia Nohrenhold)
3|Page

Plot in Area 1

Artemisia
Butter&Eggs
Stipa
Bull Thistle
Bare Ground

Figure 5 - Vegetation Results from Left Plot, Area 1

Plot in Area 1(right)

Artemisia
Salt Grass
Bare Ground
Stipa
Vetch
Cheat Grass
Rabbit Brush

Figure 6 - Vegetation Results from Right Plot, Area 1

4|Page

Plot in Area 3

Needtle&Thread
Globe Mallow
Salt Grass
Sage
Bare Ground

Figure 7 - Plot from Area 3

Plot in Area 5

Sage
Thistle
Bare Gorund
Stipa

Figure 8 - Plot from Area 5

5|Page

Table 1- Sizes of Selected Shrubs

Bull Thistle
Butter&Eggs
Needle&Thread
Rabbit Brush
Ragwort

Basal Areaof Shrub Plants
Widest
Base
Height
3cm
2cm
14cm
6cm
3.9cm
21cm
57cm
15cm
32cm
17cm
3cm
28cm
14cm
28cm
11cm

Shrubs (Olivia Nohrenhold)
Bull Thistle (Cirsium vulgare)
Is originally from Europe and Asia, but has spread to North America. It can survive in many areas, but prefers an open area especially after it has been disturbed. Usually this plant has a two year life span and is reproduced by seeds. Uses for this plant can be edible, grazing, and even medical by mashing the plant and placing it against the sore jaw or using the steam after boiling for rheumatic joints. Butter and Eggs (Linaria vulgarism)

This species is originally from Europe and northern Asia but has been introduced North America. Typically this plant will inhabit disturbed areas, ie - along roads. Uses for this plant can be used as medicine for numerous ailments. A tea made from leaves can be used as a laxative, and the leaves/flowers can also be used as ointments, even insecticide in some cases.

Needle and Thread (Stipa comata)
This plant is native to Utah and is an invasive species which reproduces in disturbed areas, and is well adapted to sandy/loomy soil. Uses for this plant are forage before spring plants bloom, and saving...
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