Term Shopping Mall

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What is a Mall ?
A shopping mall, shopping center/centre, shopping arcade, shopping precinct, or simply mall is one or more buildings forming a complex of shops representing merchandisers, with interconnecting walkways enabling visitors to easily walk from unit to unit, along with a parking area – a modern, indoor version of the traditional marketplace. Modern "car-friendly" strip malls developed from the 1920s, and shopping malls corresponded with the rise of suburban living in many parts of the Western World, especially the United States, after World War II. From early on, the design tended to be inward-facing, with malls following theories of how customers could best be enticed in a controlled environment. Similar, the concept of a mall having one or more "anchor store" or "big box stores" was pioneered early, with individual stores or smaller-scale chain stores intended to benefit from the shoppers attracted by the big stores.[1] Regional differences

In most places, the term shopping center (shopping centre in British Commonwealth English) is used, especially in Europe, Australia, and South America; however shopping mall is also used, predominantly in North America.[2] Outside of North America, shopping precinct and shopping arcade are also used. In North America, Gulf countries, and India, the term shopping mall is usually applied to enclosed retail structures (and is generally abbreviated to simply mall), while shopping center usually refers to open-air retail complexes; both types of facilities usually have large parking lots, face major traffic arterials, and have few pedestrian connections to surrounding neighborhoods.[2]

Shopping arcade in Tokyo, Japan
Shopping centers in the United Kingdom can be referred to as "shopping centres" or "shopping precincts". Mall primarily refers to either a shopping mall – a place where a collection of shops all adjoin a pedestrian area – or an exclusively pedestrianized street that allows shoppers to walk without interference from vehicle traffic. Mall is generally used in North America to refer to a large shopping area usually composed of a single building which contains multiple shops, usually "anchored" by one or more department stores surrounded by a parking lot, while the term arcade is more often used, especially in Britain, to refer to a narrow pedestrian-only street, often covered or between closely spaced buildings (see town center). History

Cabot Circus in Bristol city centre, England
One of the earliest examples of public shopping malls come from Ancient Rome . One of the earliest public shopping centers is Trajan's Market in Rome located in Trajan's Forum. Trajan's Market was probably built around 100-110 AD by Apollodorus of Damascus, and is thought to be the world's oldest shopping center and a forerunner for the shopping mall.[4][5] Numerous covered shopping arcades, such as the 19th-century Al-Hamidiyah Souq in Damascus, Syria, can be considered precursors to the present-day shopping mall.

Advantages and disadvantages of a mall
At shopping malls, you can end up buying more things than you'd planned, thanks to the abundant availability of goods and services. Mall culture has become big business, as shopping malls have evolved into multi-storied structures housing a large number of stores that sell diverse products and services. Shopping malls house a collection of retail stores and restaurants, adjoined by pedestrian areas or an exclusive pedestrian street. In 1928, the Arcade in Providence, Rhode Island was the first to introduce the shopping mall concept to the United States. However, the concept was not new, if you consider the indoor, multi-vendor shopping of Isfahan, Iran's Grand Bazaar in the 10th century. 1. Availability of Parking

* Parking is one of the major hassles for people who go into the city to shop. Shopping at malls eliminates this problem, because parking is provided either free of charge or for a nominal fee....
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