Term Paper

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Glossolalia, Pentecostalism, Azusa Street Revival
  • Pages : 6 (1521 words )
  • Download(s) : 97
  • Published : May 18, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Skip to main content

Contact Us
-------------------------------------------------
Top of Form

Bottom of Form

-------------------------------------------------
Top of Form
Search form

Bottom of Form

* Home
* About Us
* Testimonies
* Bible Studies
* Health & Healing
* Youth
* FAQ
* Overview
* Full Sheet List
* Leaflets
* Jesus Christ
* Salvation
* The Holy Spirit
* Prayer
* The Bible
* Revival
* A Christian Walk
* Basics of Christianity
* Sin and Judgment
* The Old Paths
* Family & Children
* Health & Healing
* The Bible and Alcohol
* God in History
* Bible Prophecy
* National Israel and Judah
* Assembly History
* Christianity and Society
* Creation versus Evolution
* Catholic Church
* Other Religions
* David Wilkerson
History of the Pentecostal Movement
 “And it shall come to pass afterward, that I will pour out my spirit upon all flesh; and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, your old men shall dream dreams, your young men shall see visions: And also upon the servants and upon the handmaids in those days will I pour out my spirit” (JOEL 2:28-29). “And when the day of Pentecost was fully come, they were all with one accord in one place. And suddenly there came a sound from heaven as of a rushing mighty wind, and it filled all the house where they were sitting. And there appeared unto them cloven tongues like as of fire, and it sat upon each of them. And they were all filled with the Holy Ghost, and began to speak with other tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance” (ACTS 2:1-4). Precursors to the Pentecostal Movement

John Alexander Dowie
John Alexander Dowie The Pentecostal Movement grew out of the Holiness Revival of the second half of the nineteenth century. This revival was an expression of both social and theological discontent among the nation's lower and middle-class groups. Holiness followers disapproved of the godlessness in mainline denominations, as well as the growing wealth and lack of simplicity of their churches. Not content to remain in mainline churches, they formed new religious communities committed to seeking perfection in Christ. These former Methodists, Presbyterians and Baptists were experiencing a renewed outpouring of the Holy Spirit much like the early church experienced in the book of Acts. The Holiness Revival produced a hunger for the Baptism of the Holy Spirit (a divine empowerment of believers) and for other spiritual gifts promised to the New Testament church such as healing and prophecy. In the nineteenth century, Edward Irving, a popular Presbyterian pastor in London, sought after the restoration of the spiritual gifts or charisms in the modern church. Irving led the first attempt at "charismatic/spiritual renewal" in his Regents Square Presbyterian Church in 1831. Although the gifts of tongues and prophecies were operated in his church, Irving was not successful in his quest of restoring New Testament Christianity. In the end, the "Catholic Apostolic Church" which was founded by his followers, attempted to restore the "five-fold ministries" (of apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers) in addition to the spiritual gifts. Irving pointed to speaking in tongues as the first manifestation of the baptism in/receiving the Holy Spirit, a major facet in the future of the Pentecostals. In the United States, holiness leaders such as Charles Cullis, John Alexander Dowie, and Albert B. Simpson established healing missions across the states. They, like other holiness advocates, believed a new, miraculous era of the Spirit was occurring which would end in the second coming of Christ. Albert B. Simpson

Albert B. Simpson Another predecessor to Pentecostalism was the Keswick "Higher Life" movement which flourished in England after 1875. Led at first by American holiness teachers such as Hannah Whitall Smith and William E....
tracking img